January 28, 2013 10:47:01 PM
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This drawing was done in park in the Lower East Side, in a little notebook, soon after I quit school and came back to New York City.

One day, back in the late 1990's, I was goofing off at the French National Library, having decided not to pursue my doctorate but determined to nevertheless enjoy the privileges of the reading room till the end of the semester. Waiting for a book to be delivered to my desk, I started leisurely clicking my laptop, opening mysterious files that had somehow ended up in the garbage. (Remember when Mac files would end up in the garbage after a crash? In a file called "Recovered Files," saved by the computer fairy?) I opened one and it was titled: "The phenomenology of slime." It was just a few sentences that I barely remembered typing, all alone, in the middle of the night in my garret, with the BBC World Service on the radio, as usual. It said:

"There’s a scientist on the radio right now who’s saying, “When you think of the immensity of the universe, you realize that we humans are just a bit of slime on the surface of a planet!”

You know what I have to say to that? Speak for yourself, slimeball!"

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Carolita

Comments [3]

CAROLINE from nj

See? It's string theory. You are in a parallel universe and you just happened to run into your-yourself. Excellent! And the's the answer ~ We are Not Alone in our-our Universe;]

Feb. 01 2013 09:47 AM
michael crawford from nyc

funny! you should have your own show!

Jan. 29 2013 02:32 AM
carolita from NYC

I forgot to say: I burst out laughing when I read it. I wondered who wrote it, at first, then realized it was me. Am I alone in the universe? Maybe, but if so, I find myself good company.

Jan. 28 2013 10:51 PM

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