Eric Molinsky

Eric Molinsky appears in the following:

Will Computers Take Over the World?

Friday, January 24, 2014

It’s been a trope in science fiction for years: someday the computers will become self-aware and take over. But in 1993, the computer scientist and science fiction author Vernor Vinge wrote a serious academic paper in which he predicted that we were only a few decades away from that ...

Video: Ray Kurzweil’s lecture at Singularity University

Comments [3]

American Icons: The Wizard of Oz

Friday, November 29, 2013

It's been over seventy years since movie audiences first watched The Wizard of Oz. Meet the original man behind the curtain, L. Frank Baum, who had all the vision of Walt Disney, but none of the business sense. Discover how Oz captivated the imaginations of Russians living under Soviet rule ...

Comments [8]

Lucy Liu: On-Screen and On-Canvas

Friday, November 15, 2013

In the mid-1990s, a promising young artist started showing her paintings and photographs at galleries in New York. Over the years, Yu Ling built a respectable career with exhibits in Los Angeles, Miami, Munich, and London. Then a few years ago, the art world learned that Yu Ling is also Lucy Liu ...

Slideshow: Lucy Liu's paintings

Comments [2]

American Icons: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Friday, October 04, 2013

How do you build a monument to a war that was more tragic than triumphant? Maya Lin was practically a kid when she got the commission to design the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall. Her minimalistic granite wall was derided by one vet as a “black gash of shame.” But inscribed with the name of every fallen soldier, it became a sacred place for veterans and their families, and it influenced later designs like the National September 11 Memorial. 

Bonus Track: Kurt Andersen's full interview with Maya Lin

Comments [28]

Drone Art

Friday, September 27, 2013

Movies and TV are absorbing drones (or unmanned aerial vehicles as they are properly called) as plot devices in The Bourne Legacy and Homeland, for example. But some fine artists are also trying to sway this national conversation. Adam Harvey designs burqas and hijabs that make the wearer invisible ...

Video: Dancing with Robots

Comments [1]

Making Friends with Drones

Friday, September 27, 2013

Missy Cummings saw the dawn of the age of drones — sorry, “unmanned aerial vehicles” — firsthand from the deck of an aircraft carrier. As one of the Navy's first female fighter pilots, flying an F-18, Cummings realized that improvements in GPS were going to obviate her job. So she switched gears ...

Comments [2]

American Icons: Anything Goes

Friday, September 13, 2013

Cole Porter lived in Europe during the 1920s, and returned to American to write a sharp satire of this freewheeling era that has outlived the people and events it referred to. Music historian Will Friedwald explains how Frank Sinatra saved the song, and we hear a new version written by Joe Keenan.

Exclusive Bonus Track: An updated version of "Anything Goes"

Comments [23]

Neil Harbisson, Cyborg

Friday, August 31, 2012

Neil Harbisson is a painter, a musician, and a cyborg. Born with a rare form of colorblindness, Harbisson can only see the world in grays. In 2004, he collaborated with a scientist to create a device called the Eyeborg, which he wears everywhere — even in his passport picture ...

Video: Neil Harbisson's Sonochromatic Portrait #1

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The Posthuman Future

Friday, August 31, 2012

Everything we’re able to do today to enhance humans — from genetic engineering to artificial limbs — simply improves on the base model we were born with. But for some, that doesn’t go far enough. They think we shouldn’t be stuck with the factory-installed settings in our DNA ...

Slideshow: Transhumanist Art

Comments [3]

Object Breast Cancer

Friday, August 03, 2012

The pink ribbon has been an incredibly successful piece of marketing for breast cancer research. For cancer survivor Leonor Caraballo, though, it's supremely annoying. Caraballo is a sculptor who collaborates with her husband, Abou Farman. The couple came up with a new ...

Slideshow: Tumor as Sculpture

Comments [6]

A Golden Age for Women in Hollywood?

Friday, July 13, 2012

A couple years ago, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win an Oscar for directing The Hurt Locker. It wasn’t quite the tipping point for women many in the industry had hoped for: of the 250 major movies that came out last year in the US, women directed only 5% of them ...

Video: Take This Waltz (clip)

Comments [5]

Finding the Next Fifty Shades of Grey

Friday, June 08, 2012

Sellers and publishers of books from all over the world convened in New York this week for their annual convention, Book Expo America. Conference discussions focused on e-books, social media, and self-publishing, but the real buzz was about a book: a dirty book. E.L. James ...

Comments [5]

Videogames Go Indie

Friday, June 01, 2012

Just like with movies, videogames come in different sizes: the blockbusters with massive marketing campaigns, and the quirkier small releases that get known by word of mouth. "A lot of independence has to do with making something that doesn’t have a place yet," explains Ian Bogost. ...

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Playing Doctor

Friday, May 18, 2012

Television drama has created the impression of an ideal world where decisions in hospitals are made quickly and cost is never an issue. It directly affects our expectations for treatment, according to Billy Goldberg, an emergency-room physician, and Joseph Turow ...

Video: A scene from the Scrubs episode "My Musical"

Comments [1]

Snapped: A Soldier's Story

Friday, March 23, 2012

A murderous rampage in Afghanistan earlier this month left 16 civilians, nine of them children, dead. The stereotype of the combat veteran who snaps in an act of crazed violence has been familiar since the Vietnam War in movies and fiction. The novelist and essayist George Saunders ...

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Voting With Your Remote Control

Friday, March 09, 2012

We’ve always heard the television brought Americans together. Now a lot of what’s on just makes us mad at each other. Sociologist Max Kilger says you can tell a person’s politics by the television they watch. Studio 360’s Eric Molinsky decided to do his own experiment. He submitted ...

Comments [29]

Aha Moment: Gravity's Rainbow

Friday, February 24, 2012

Gerald Joyce is a professor of biochemistry at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. In the 1970s, he was studying biochemistry at The University of Chicago, when he discovered Gravity's Rainbow, the sprawling World War II novel by Thomas Pynchon ...

Comments [3]

Ghostwriters

Friday, January 13, 2012

The best-seller list is dominated by memoirs and self-help books written by celebrities and politicians. Or “written” by celebrities and politicians. “On the non-fiction best-seller list, 12 out of the 15 books listed probably have been ghostwritten,” reveals literary agent Madeleine Morel. ...

Comments [17]

Neil Harbisson, Cyborg

Friday, November 04, 2011

Neil Harbisson is a painter, a musician, and a cyborg. Born with a rare form of colorblindness, Harbisson can only see the world in grays. In 2004, he collaborated with a scientist to create a device called the Eyeborg, which he wears everywhere — even in his passport picture ...

Video: Neil Harbisson's Sonochromatic Portrait #1

Comments [1]

The Posthuman Future

Friday, November 04, 2011

Everything we’re able to do today to enhance humans — from genetic engineering to artificial limbs — simply improves on the base model we were born with. But for some people, that doesn’t go far enough. They think we shouldn’t be stuck with the factory-installed settings in our DNA. And they're not satisfied with a lifespan ...

Slideshow: Transhumanist Art

Comments [13]