Sara Fishko

Sara Fishko is an Executive Producer and Host at WNYC, specializing in culture.

Her long-running series Fishko Files has become a staple of WNYC’s cultural programming, tackling a broad range of subjects, from a portrait of media guru Marshall McLuhan, to a meditation on the Symbolist painting  “Isle of the Dead,” to a consideration of the future of film criticism.  The pieces run on Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as Studio 360 and On The Media.

Fishko produced and hosted the ten-part Jazz Loft Project Radio Series, derived from a treasure trove of archival tapes recorded by  photographer W. Eugene Smith in his dilapidated Manhattan home in a loft building in the 1950s and 60s. The series, which ran on WNYC and NPR, later became four special programs known as The Jazz Loft Anthology.  

She has also made compelling hour-long programs featuring interviews with and performances by Keith Jarrett, Dave Brubeck, Ned Rorem and others. Her special program Culture Shock 1913 is a spirited telling of the history and development of Modernist art and culture in the early years of the 20th century.

Sara Fishko has won multiple awards from RTNDA (Edward R. Murrow Award), The Deadline Club, The Newswomen’s Club of New York (Front Page Award), The Associated Press and The New York Press Club. She received a Deems Taylor Award from ASCAP for the Jazz Loft series, and was selected as a USC/Annenberg Arts Journalism Fellow in 2003 and 2011.

Her blog Fishko Now and Then is about culture now and culture then, and it appears…now and then.

 

 

 

Sara Fishko appears in the following:

American Icons: The Tramp

Friday, June 27, 2014

With just a pair of baggy pants, a derby hat, mustache, floppy shoes, and his own physical genius, Charlie Chaplin created silent film's most memorable character — the Tramp.

Video: Charlie Chaplin in Kid Auto Races at Venice

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Frank Stella's Blues

Friday, July 22, 2011

Frank Stella has had a long and varied career.  He made his name in the 1950s with a series of all-black paintings, when that kind of thing was audacious; moved on to boldly colored striped canvasses by the 1960s; and in more recent decades...

Bonus Tracks: Hear the sonatas that inspired Stella's sculptures

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Artie Shaw

Friday, May 21, 2010

Artie Shaw looked like a matinee idol, had his own big band, and a major hit while still in his twenties. But that success may have been the beginning of his undoing. This week Shaw would've turned 100, and WNYC's Sara Fishko takes a look back ...

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Happy Birthday, Chopin

Friday, March 26, 2010

"His music seems to fall from heaven," says Garrick Ohlsson of Frederic Chopin. As we mark the composer's 200th birthday, Ohlsson talks to WNYC's Sara Fishko about Chopin's influence on classical piano music.

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West Side Story, 1957

Friday, April 17, 2009

WNYC's Sara Fishko tells a story rarely heard about the musical's legendary creators Jerome Robbins, Leonard Bernstein, Arthur Laurents, and Stephen Sondheim. And she explores how Cold War tensions simmered under the surface of the show's ethnic gang battles. 

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Remembering Rosenman

Friday, December 05, 2008

Composer Leonard Rosenman passed away earlier this year but his scores for films like "East of Eden," "Fantastic Voyage," and "Rebel Without a Cause" live on. Produced by Sara Fishko.

Watch the original "Fantastic Voyage" trailer

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Remembering Bernstein

Friday, September 26, 2008

This fall New York is celebrating what would’ve been Leonard Bernstein’s 90th birthday. As conductor of the New York Philharmonic, he changed the way audiences understood classical music. Five musicians from the Philharmonic remember playing under Bernstein’s baton. Produced by WNYC’s Sara Fishko.

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Van in the USSR

Friday, April 04, 2008

Fifty years ago, a pianist from Texas named Van Cliburn won the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow. It was the height of the Cold War and when he returned to the States, he was honored with a ticker tape parade down Broadway’s “Canyon of Heroes.” Produced by WNYC’s

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West Side Story

Friday, September 21, 2007

On the 50th anniversary of its debut on Broadway, we hear one of the rarely-told stories about the musical’s legendary creators Jerome Robbins, Leonard Bernstein, Arthur Laurents, and Stephen Sondheim. WNYC’s Sara Fishko explores how Cold War tensions simmered under the surface of the show’s ...

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William Bolcom

Friday, December 08, 2006

Plenty of classical composers like to borrow a snippet from pop music, or throw in a little reference to a well-known song in a piece of "serious music." William Bolcom prefers to go whole hog. WNYC's Sara Fishko talked to Bolcom for our series ...

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American Icons: The Tramp

Friday, November 24, 2006

With just a pair of baggy pants, a derby hat, mustache, floppy shoes, and his own physical genius, Charlie Chaplin created silent film's most memorable character - the Tramp.

Comments [1]

American Prometheus

Friday, November 03, 2006

Physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer led a team of thousands to create the first nuclear weapon. He was immediately hailed as an American hero, but after speaking out against the use of the bomb he was condemned as a traitor and maligned as a Communist spy. Sara Fishko ...

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Tania Leon

Friday, October 27, 2006

The elements of music - melody, rhythm, harmony and so on - are so related they're almost inseparable. But Cuban-born composer Tania Leon is a rhythm-minded sort. She explains to Sara Fishko that she gets rhythm; and not just one rhythm, many rhythms.

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Osvaldo Golijov

Friday, September 29, 2006

Critics have said that Osvaldo Golijov may be the first significant classical music composer to define the sound of the 21st century. It's part of the reason why he was named a MacArthur fellow in 2003. Jeff Lunden spoke with Golijov about his love ...

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Vive La French Music

Thursday, September 07, 2006

Ned Rorem is an American composer who loves French music. He spoke with WNYC's Sara Fishko as part of a series on living composers and their relationship with the past.

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Friedhofer

Friday, April 28, 2006

In some ways, the career of film composer Hugo Friedhofer was a typical Hollywood story. He was a brilliant musician who created some of the most memorable scores -- like the soundtrack to The Best Years Of Our Lives -- but never got the fame he deserved. WNYC's

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American Prometheus

Friday, March 10, 2006

Physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer led a team of thousands to create the first nuclear weapon. He was immediately hailed as an American hero, but after speaking out against the use of the bomb he was condemned as a traitor and maligned as a Communist spy. WNYC's Sara ...

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Kochel

Saturday, January 28, 2006

We'd have a harder time appreciating Mozart without the work of the mysterious figure whose "k." precedes all 626 of Mozart's works. WNYC's Sara Fishko has the story of Kochel, cataloguer of genius.

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Renaissance Rivals

Saturday, October 15, 2005

Sara Fishko surveys the great rivalries of history. She spoke with the late art historian Rona Goffen, who found that envy is responsible for some of the masterpieces of Western art.

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American Prometheus

Saturday, October 08, 2005

Physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer led a team of thousands to create the first nuclear weapon. He was immediately hailed as an American hero, but after speaking out against the use of the bomb he was condemned as a traitor and maligned as a Communist spy. WNYC’s Sara Fishko examines how ...

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