Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Recently in Science and Creativity

Want to Be Creative? Try Getting Bored

Thursday, January 22, 2015

We’ve banished boredom with our phones. Recent research suggests that we might be banishing our creativity along with it.

Comments [3]

How Hubble Brought Color to the Universe

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Stunning images of nebulae and galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope have conditioned the way we think space should look.

Comment

4,000 Years of Picturing the Stars

Thursday, January 15, 2015

A new book surveys the history of humanity’s attempts to depict the universe, with results both beautiful and surprisingly accurate.

Comment

It’s a Giant Dirt Igloo – Want to Buy It?

Thursday, January 08, 2015

An architect designing a lunar colony for NASA discovered that the dome-shaped buildings could work as inexpensive housing here on Earth.

Comments [4]

Electronic Sculptures Need the Human Touch

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Nam Jun Paik pioneered new media art. But when the 1960s technology in his sculptures needs repairs, there’s only one man for the job.

Comments [1]

Two Artists Let the Animals Speak for Themselves

Thursday, December 11, 2014

People have always told stories about animals acting like humans. Two artists ask: what if we told stories that were true to animals’ lives?

Comments [1]

Billboard Top Five, But for Whales

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Marine biologists have found evidence of the biggest cultural transformation in nature: whale songs that spread across the Pacific Ocean in a matter of months.

Comments [1]

Marianne Moore’s Odes to Animals

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Marianne Moore loved learning about animals, and she crammed more scientific detail into her poems than anyone before.

Comment

How Pop Music Helped Save the Whales

Thursday, December 11, 2014

The scientist who discovered whale song knew it was something special. When he won over singer-songwriter Judy Collins, the result jump-started an environmentalist movement.

Comments [2]

Do Animals Have Culture?

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Some interesting research in current biology shows that animals have culture. But how much can we say about their taste without projecting our own onto them?

Comments [1]

Making Music For Animals

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Can music help soothe the anxious behaviors of animals in captivity? And what kinds of music do animals like, anyway?

Comments [1]

Decoding Nature’s Most Elaborate Mating Dances

Thursday, December 11, 2014

A Yale ornithologist argues that our definition or art is way too narrow. It’s not just a human activity — lots of plants and animals have aesthetic experiences, too.

Comments [3]

Alan Turing, Man and Myth

Friday, November 21, 2014

The Imitation Game stars Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing, the British code breaker and mathematician. But Turing, the original computer genius, remains enigmatic.

Comments [1]

Alan Turing, Digital Pioneer

Friday, November 21, 2014

Alan Turing’s pioneering vision for computers continues to shape our daily lives, decades after his death.

Comments [2]

Going Viral

Friday, September 12, 2014

From rabies in ancient Greece to a pandemic in World of Warcraft, we look at how viruses have spread through the cultural imagination.

Comments [5]

Viruses at the Movies

Friday, September 12, 2014

Radiation used to be Hollywood’s go-to plot device. Now, viruses explain everything from vampires to the zombie apocalypse — but that’s not what really scares public health experts.

Comments [1]

Does Your Zombie Have Rabies?

Friday, September 12, 2014

Some of our culture’s most enduring monsters transmit their contagion through biting — werewolves, zombies, and vampires. Are these myths really about rabies?

Comment

Reconstructing Viruses

Friday, September 12, 2014

Why do scientists want to recreate viral monsters like the 1918 Spanish flu? And if they do, should they be allowed to publish the instructions?

Comments [1]

The Flame Alphabet

Friday, September 12, 2014

William S. Burroughs famously said that “language is a virus.” In his novel The Flame Alphabet, Ben Marcus imagines what would happen if children’s language made their parents sick.

Comment

Playing Against the Virus

Friday, September 12, 2014

When an unintentional pandemic spread through World of Warcraft, epidemiologists studied the online game to learn real-world lessons.

Comments [1]