Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Recently in Science and Creativity

The Multiheroes of the Superverse

Thursday, December 10, 2015

For decades, comic-book writers have been using the idea of a multiverse to keep superheroes’ conflicting storylines separate.

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Turning the Scottish Countryside into a Map of the Multiverse

Thursday, December 10, 2015

A landscape artist transformed an old coal mine into a piece of cosmic art. 

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The Theoretical Physicist Wore a Toga

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Long before physicists started debating theories of parallel universes, the ancient Greeks were hatching theories of their own.

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It’s Tommy Westphall’s Universe, We Just Live in It

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Taken to its logical conclusion, the enigmatic final episode of the show “St. Elsewhere” suggests that nearly all TV shows exist within the mind of one very creative boy.

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What Is the Multiverse (Or, How Can There Be Two Mr. Spocks)?

Thursday, December 10, 2015

The concept of the multiverse has long captured the imaginations of science-fiction writers. Now, some physicists are starting to believe.

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Hugh Everett Is Alive and Well in an Alternate Universe

Thursday, December 10, 2015

When he was 19, Mark Everett’s father died. But his big idea, a surprising interpretation of quantum mechanics, lived on. And if that idea is right, he might still be alive … somewhere.

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Across the Multiverse

Thursday, December 10, 2015

This week’s show: Alternate universes aren’t just sci-fi speculation — they could be real, physicists say.

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Artists and Scientists Collide at CERN

Thursday, December 03, 2015

The artist-in-residence program at the Large Hadron Collider immerses artists into the world of theoretical physics. The result challenges both the artists and the scientists.

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Virtual Reality Starts Getting Real

Thursday, December 03, 2015

Virtual reality is finally here. What will that mean for the future of storytelling?

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Eve Sussman's Algorithmic Noir

Thursday, November 12, 2015

The movie “whiteonwhite” has human actors, director, and crew. But its editor is an algorithm that creates a different version of the film each time it plays. 

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Smart Programs Read Shakespeare

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Researchers at MIT think the secret to artificial intelligence might not be processing power, but storytelling.

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Designing a Computer with Great Taste

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Researchers at Brigham Young University are training a computer program to evaluate a work of art. What happens when it judges artists in a juried show?

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Lisa Randall: Knocking on Heaven's Door

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Harvard physicist Lisa Randall is at the forefront of the search for dark matter. But she thinks good science should be beautiful, too.

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The Computer As Artist

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Creative types tend to think computers will never take their jobs. They haven’t met Brutus.

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Aha Moment: "The Golden Compass"

Thursday, October 08, 2015

When Julia Pilowsky read “The Golden Compass” by Philip Pullman, she was so struck by the idea of animal daemons she decided to get one herself.  

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A Neuroscientist Throws Science Overboard for Art

Thursday, July 23, 2015

One neuroscientist found that art gave him more fulfillment and excitement than scientific research. So he abandoned the lab for the art studio. 

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A Quantified Artist Turns Her Data into Sculpture

Thursday, July 02, 2015

Laurie Frick takes self-tracking data and turns it into beautiful sculptures. Collecting personal data isn’t a privacy issue for her — it’s an opportunity to make art.

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Bringing Female Heroes to the LEGO Universe

Thursday, June 04, 2015

LEGO is stuck in the past with its lack of professional female characters. Maia Weinstock is trying to change that with sets of Supreme Court justices and scientists.

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“Blood Music”

Thursday, May 28, 2015

In Greg Bear's novel “Blood Music,” a scientist infected with a synthetic virus realizes that the organisms in his body have become self-aware — and they're talking in his head.

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A Crash Course in Designing Life

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Bio-hacking has become so easy, artists and hobbyists can take classes at Genspace in Brooklyn. So reporter Julia Wetherell took a crash course.

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