Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Recently in Science and Creativity

Traveling in Real Time

Friday, August 20, 2010

Kurt Andersen thinks time travel is the ultimate fantasy. He's made peace with the fact that he probably won't be climbing into a time machine any time soon — because, he explains, he already has. The past isn't nearly as dead as we thought.

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The Mechanics of Time Travel

Friday, August 20, 2010

Simon Wells is the great-grandson of H.G. Wells. He directed the 2002 film adaptation of his ancestor's classic novel, The Time Machine. Wells has very specific ideas about how a time machine should be designed — but David Goldberg says the time ...

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Connie Willis

Friday, August 20, 2010

Author Connie Willis, winner of multiple Hugo and Nebula awards, admits that she was first drawn to the concept of time travel out of a desire to go back and fix her own mistakes. Now she loves using it to allow her characters to ...

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The Science of Time Travel

Friday, August 20, 2010

David Goldberg teaches physics at Drexel University. In A User's Guide to the Universe, he explains how time travel might be possible. He tells Kurt why the skeptics are wrong.

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Turn On. Tune In. Drop Out.

Friday, August 13, 2010

"If I were at work right now, I'd be paid to have these thoughts." With that thought, Zack Booth Simpson dropped out of high school — then started reading biology textbooks and designing video games. Now he's at a university — not as a student, but as a ...

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Saul Griffith

Friday, August 06, 2010

In an age of hyper-specialization, Saul Griffith is an old-school inventor. A MacArthur "genius," his work includes a new way to manufacture eyeglasses, kites that generate power, and rope that knows how much weight it carries. Griffith explains how to get kids fascinated by science: promise ...

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The Science of Sculpture

Friday, July 09, 2010

Don Ingber is a cell biologist from Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital. One day he saw a piece of modern sculpture, Kenneth Snelson's "Needle Tower" — and Eureka! — it inspired a scientific breakthrough. Produced by

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Alpha

Friday, June 18, 2010

Acclaimed novelist Lydia Millet imagines a future where a genetic engineering accident has wiped out much of the earth's plant life. When a few blades of grass appear on a remote island, a scientist goes to investigate. Martha Plimpton reads the story. With production ...

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Bonus Track: More from Dutton

Friday, June 18, 2010

According to Dutton, Igor Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" shows how our art instinct is still evolving.

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Darwin: A Life in Poems

Friday, June 18, 2010

On the Origin of Species is 150 years old, but the work of Charles Darwin remains as influential as ever. Darwin's great-great-granddaughter, Ruth Padel, tells her famous ancestor's life story all in verse. One poem describes Darwin's awe at the sealife that washed up ...

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Museum of God

Friday, June 18, 2010

Amateur paleontologist Jon Halsey isn't afraid to turn over a few rocks. By digging in areas near his home outside of Dallas, he's been able to amass an extensive collection of fossils which he stores in his garage. He calls the collection "The American Museum of God," ...

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Homo-Thespian

Friday, June 18, 2010

A new play, "Hominid," reenacts a violent incident that took place in a chimpanzee colony. Primate expert Frans de Waal and the play's actors describe what it took to stage a chimpanzee drama with a very human story. Produced by Philip Graitcer, with

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Evolution

Friday, June 18, 2010

Studio 360 puts evolution to the test. On the Origin of Species is 150 years old, but the work of Charles Darwin remains as influential as ever. Darwin's descendant, Ruth Padel, writes poems about her famous relative. Spencer Wells gathers DNA around the world to determine where we came from. An amateur paleontologist finds a way to believe in both God and the fossil record. Plus the world premiere of a short science fiction story by Lydia Millet, imagining the downside of messing too much with genes.

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Spencer Wells

Friday, June 18, 2010

Where did we come from? Evolutionary biologist Spencer Wells is pretty close to the answer. He's the National Geographic "Explorer-in-Residence" and heads an initiative called the Genographic Project. His new book is called Pandora's Seed. By collecting DNA samples from people around the world, ...

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Ruth Padel: "Survival of the Fittest"

Friday, June 18, 2010

Padel reads from her collection, Darwin: A Life in Poems.

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Oh My God, Charlie Darwin

Friday, June 18, 2010

"Set the sails; I feel the winds a'stirring." So begins the song, "Charlie Darwin," by the rock band The Low Anthem. Frontman Ben Knox Miller describes how the band came up with the tune and its darker message, "Who could heed the ...

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The Art Instinct

Friday, June 18, 2010

Denis Dutton is a professor of the philosophy of art interested in evolutionary biology. In his controversial book The Art Instinct, he argues that certain tastes in art are genetic. Dutton believes that if we examine art from around the world, we can see the marks ...

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Bonus Track: More From Holmes

Friday, May 21, 2010

Holmes talks about Humphrey Davy's experiments with nitrous oxide, a.k.a. "laughing gas," and its effects on Samuel Coleridge and Mark Roget.

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The Age of Wonder

Friday, May 21, 2010

In his book, The Age of Wonder, Richard Holmes describes the major breakthroughs in astronomy, anthropology, and physics in late 18th and early 19th century Britain. Holmes calls the era an "age of romantic science" - when the poets and scientists inspired each other's work.

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Diagnosing Literature

Friday, April 23, 2010

Was Bartleby the Scrivener depressed? Did Clarissa Dalloway need lithium? Today's English lit students seem to want to medicate away the problems of classic literary characters. Studio 360's Eric Molinsky explores this phenomenon with help from NYU professor Elayne Tobin and novelist Michael ...

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