Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Recently in Science and Creativity

Design for the Real World: Dialysis Machine

Friday, December 10, 2010

Before the invention of the dialysis machine, kidney failure was basically a death sentence. Registered nurse Janice Breen explains how the design of dialysis machines has evolved since she started working with them back in 1973. Produced by Gretta Cohn.

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Art as Medicine

Friday, December 10, 2010

Art is changing medicine. Music helps patients recover in a burn unit, a children's cancer doctor turns to fiction writing, and medical students learn how honing their narrative skills will make them better doctors.

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Music Heals

Friday, December 10, 2010

After piano music helped him recover from brain surgery, Dr. Richard Fratianne became a true believer in music therapy. In the burn unit at the Cleveland MetroHealth Medical Center, Fratianne is measuring patients’ stress hormones during procedures to try to prove that music therapy

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Novelist Chris Adrian

Friday, December 10, 2010

Chris Adrian's novels tell dark, fantastical stories that draw on his experience working as a pediatric oncologist. Adrian tells Kurt how writing helps him deal with the emotional burden of the medicine he practices.

Anne Marie Nest reads selections from Adrian’s forthcoming novel, The ...

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Playing Doctor

Friday, December 10, 2010

Television drama has created the impression of an ideal world where decisions in hospitals are made quickly and cost is never an issue. It directly affects our expectations for treatment, according to Billy Goldberg, an emergency-room physician, and Joseph Turow, the author of Playing ...

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Narrative Medicine

Friday, December 10, 2010

Medical students spend hours studying information on charts and graphs, but when was the last time they studied the meaning behind a good story? We visited a group of OB/GYN residents taking a narrative medicine class to see how embracing fiction can improve patient care. Produced by

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More with Jill Sonke

Friday, December 10, 2010

Jill Sonke tells Kurt about the benefits and challenges that come with bringing art and artists into health care environments.

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Jill Sonke

Friday, December 10, 2010

Can the arts actually improve health care? Kurt gets some answers from Jill Sonke, director of the Center for the Arts in Healthcare at the University of Florida. She explains how the arts have been carving out a place in the healing process.

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Design for the Real World: Neon

Friday, December 03, 2010

Neon signage has been around for exactly a century, but today the glowing lights face competition from cheaper LED technology. Physics professor Eric Schiff and Jeff Friedman, of New York's Let There Be Neon studio, explain what's behind neon's everlasting glow. Produced by Jordan Sayle.

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DJ Scientific

Friday, November 19, 2010

Marc Branch works at NASA as an aerospace engineer testing instruments used on outer-space telescopes. When he's off the clock, Branch is one of the most sought after hip-hop DJs around the country. Leading a double life as "DJ Scientific" he hopes to attract young hip-hop ...

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Crochet, Geometry, and the Coral Reef

Friday, October 15, 2010

Until recently, mathematicians believed you couldn't represent hyperbolic geometry in real space, but a Latvian math professor discovered a way — using crochet. Some science educators realized those same hyperbolic shapes mimicked the forms in coral reefs. And now their Crochet Coral Reef Project has landed ...

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The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics

Friday, October 15, 2010

When science fiction was just catching on in the early 20th century, writers looked to the field of quantum mechanics for ideas. They sensationalized scientific advancements and sparked public fear. Physics professor James Kakalios — author of The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics — tells Kurt ...

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The Afterlife of Sum

Friday, September 17, 2010

What if God was a bickering couple? That's just one of the provocative speculations in a book of short fiction — a surprise hit last year — called Sum: 40 Tales from the Afterlives. Another surprise: its author, David Eagleman, is a neuroscience researcher at Baylor ...

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Aquarium Poet

Friday, September 10, 2010

Jeffrey Yang spends a lot of time studying marine life. But he's not a biologist working on the beach. He's a poet who loves visiting his local aquarium. In his new book, An Aquarium, killer whales, eels, and fish become symbols of politics and mythology. Produced ...

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Nano-Photography

Friday, September 10, 2010

Felice Frankel spent the last 20 years photographing objects that only the most powerful microscopes can see. In her book No Small Matter, which she wrote with the Harvard chemist George Whitesides, Frankel shows what life on the nanoscale looks like. Produced by Studio ...

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Library of Dust

Friday, September 03, 2010

For over twenty years the Oregon State Psychiatric Hospital stored the cremated remains of patients in copper containers. Photographer David Maisel found them, and shows the beautiful — and bizarre — chemical reactions that took place as the canisters corroded in his exhibit "Library of Dust," ...

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The Science of Time Travel

Friday, August 20, 2010

David Goldberg teaches physics at Drexel University. In A User's Guide to the Universe, he explains how time travel might be possible. He tells Kurt why the skeptics are wrong.

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Janelle Monáe

Friday, August 20, 2010

The forward-thinking space funk singer performs "Sincerely, Jane" from her album Metropolis: The Chase Suite. She tells Kurt how she came to connect with her alter ego, Cindi Mayweather, an android from the 28th century.

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Visitor from the Future

Friday, August 20, 2010

Kurt's invitation to the people of the future to attend the show is answered by monologist Mike Daisey. He reports that time is a lot more fluid than we think.

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Traveling in Real Time

Friday, August 20, 2010

Kurt Andersen thinks time travel is the ultimate fantasy. He's made peace with the fact that he probably won't be climbing into a time machine any time soon — because, he explains, he already has. The past isn't nearly as dead as we thought.

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