Science and Creativity from Studio 360: the art of innovation. A sculpture unlocks a secret of cell structure, a tornado forms in a can, and a child's toy gets sent into orbit. Exploring science as a creative act since 2005. Produced by PRI and WNYC, and supported in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Recently in Science and Creativity

Cal-Earth

Friday, April 22, 2011

In Hesperia, California, architect Nader Khalili created a housing movement for the future. Khalili, who passed away in 2008, prototyped his dome-shaped adobes on a commission from NASA for a lunar colony.  Then he realized that his "superadobes" could take root on Earth.  Studio 360's Eric Molinsky visited...

Slideshow: Cal-Earth

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Eco Art

Friday, April 22, 2011

Photographer Brandon Ballengée spends his days hunting for frogs with extra legs and missing eyes. He's an eco artist, and by seeking out these mutant anomalies, he hopes to bring environmentalism to new...

Slideshow: Brandon Ballengée's Eco Art

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Christopher Alexander: A Pattern Language

Friday, April 01, 2011

Just over 30 years ago, an Englishman named Christopher Alexander tried to revolutionize architecture. In A Pattern Language, Alexander told architects and planners to design homes on emotional and spiritual principles – not on traffic flow. The revolution didn’t quite come. But the book had a ...

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Design For the Real World: The Periodic Table

Friday, April 01, 2011

For chemists, the periodic table of the elements is a hugely coveted piece of real estate. Writer Sam Kean explains the origins of the periodic table and its enduring brilliance. Produced by KJHK’s Becky Sullivan.

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Improvising the 12th Dimension

Friday, January 14, 2011

Wrapping your brain around the nature of time and the existence of multiple dimensions is a challenge, but comedian-musician Reggie Watts doesn't blink: he takes on mind-wrenching questions of theoretical physics in a fully-improvised song.

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Godfather of Bacteria

Friday, December 24, 2010

In 1928 the Scottish biologist Alexander Fleming discovered the fungus from which penicillin is derived. Fleming made the discovery while trying an unusual experiment: painting with strains of bacteria. Lindsay Patterson talked with a team that’s taking bacterial painting to a new level.

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Christmas, Atheism, and Intolerance

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

As I write this post, Christmas is just days away, and despite the overworked (though still valid) lament that it's all about commerce, hundreds of millions of Christians will take the time to go to church and turn their thoughts to the Divine. This will undoubtedly drive a small group of true believers nuts.

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Reggie Watts Gets Cosmic

Friday, December 17, 2010

Earlier this week, one-of-a-kind comedian/musician Reggie Watts rocked WNYC's Jerome L. Greene Performance Space for a special 'Studio 360' all about Theoretical Physics. That’s right…Theoretical Physics.  Here at 360, we like a little science sprinkled in with our arts and culture.

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More with Lanier

Friday, December 17, 2010

Jaron Lanier shares his predictions with Kurt about the direction our surveillance culture is headed.

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She Sees Your Every Move

Friday, December 17, 2010

Michele Iversen has been taking pictures of strangers for years. But she's not your average street photographer. At night she sits in her car and watches the warm glowing windows of strangers' homes, waiting for the perfect shot. Produced by Studio 360's Jonathan Mitchell.

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About Face

Friday, December 17, 2010

Peter Belhumeur is a professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. He's at the forefront of developing computer systems that can recognize faces — a technology that’s of great interest to the U.S. military. Belhumeur explains to Kurt why the gold standard of facial recognition is still a ...

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Jaron Lanier

Friday, December 17, 2010

Jaron Lanier is a computer scientist, philosopher, and author of the manifesto You Are Not a Gadget. He tells Kurt how our privacy has changed in recent years thanks to social networks and smart phone technology.

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Cookies

Friday, December 17, 2010

Big Brother is just a mouse click away. Our online activity is being tracked, recorded, and then sold to the highest bidder — all thanks to a little line of programming code called a "cookie." Its inventor, Lou Montulli, says that without cookies, the web would be even ...

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Watching the Watchers

Friday, December 17, 2010

The Bay Area artist Trevor Paglen calls himself an experimental geographer. For one of his latest projects, Paglen's been tracking secret government spy satellites and taking photos of them. Reporter Lisa Katayama caught up with Paglen on the roof of his loft in West ...

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I Spy

Friday, December 17, 2010

The iPhone app iSpy lets users watch thousands of live-streaming security cameras around the world. It might sound creepy, but Studio 360’s Eric Molinsky finds this anonymous voyeurism comforting.

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Surveillance

Friday, December 17, 2010

We spy on the new culture of surveillance. Kurt Andersen talks to technologist and philosopher Jaron Lanier about why we have to watch the watchers. An artist meticulously tracks government spy satellites crossing the night sky. A computer scientist explains what goes into building a facial recognition system. And sitting ...

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Bonus Audio: Plant IDs

Friday, December 17, 2010

Peter Belhumeur has been collaborating with the Smithsonian on an iPhone app for plant identification. It's based on the same systems he’s developed for facial recognition. During our visit to Belhumeur’s lab, he explained to Kurt how the app works.

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"Origin Lessons"

Friday, December 17, 2010

Studio 360 commissioned this short story from writer Aimee Bender. It has a modest subject: the Big Bang. To bone up on her science, Bender spoke with Nick Warner, a professor of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics at the University of Southern California. "Origin Lessons" is read ...

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Jazzercise from the Jazz Age

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

While doing research for our art and medicine episode, we called our colleagues in the NYPR archives — a treasure trove of nearly a century of media made or collected at the station. And they found some pretty fantastic things in the stacks. 

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