Erin Davis

Kurt and Kehinde Wiley sit in the artist's studio, in Brooklyn, NY.

Erin Davis

A vibrant portrait divides the sitting area of Wiley's studio from a large space where his works in progress lay in wait.

Erin Davis

Kurt and Wiley in front of “Place Soweto (National Assembly).”

Kehinde Wiley

“Place Soweto (National Assembly),” oil on canvas. 

Erin Davis

Photoshopped printouts of Wiley's models are used as guides for works in progress. 

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of Sean Kelly

"Shantavia Beale II," oil on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of Sean Kelly

"The Two Sisters," oil on linen. 

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of The Studio Museum in Harlem

"Conspicuous Fraud Series #1 (Eminence)," oil on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris.

"Saint Remi," stained glass. 

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of The Jewish Museum / Roberts & Tilton

"Kalkidan Mashasha," oil and gold enamel on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of The Jewish Museum

Mahmud Abu Razak, oil on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of The Jewish Museum / Roberts & Tilton

"Benediter Brkou," oil and gold and silver enamel on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley, Image courtesy of The Jewish Museum / Roberts & Tilton

Detail from "Leviathan Zodiac," oil and gold enamel on canvas.

Kehinde Wiley’s Modern-Day Royalty

The artist Kehinde Wiley wondered why he never saw people who looked like him in museums. His ground-breaking paintings, which borrow from art history, are changing that.