The first cover of the original Mad Comics, published in August 1952.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

The first cover of the original Mad Comics, published in August 1952.

The first cover of Mad Magazine. To avoid following the rules of the Code Comics Association, which severely restricted things like violence and kissing, Mad Comics was reborn as Mad Magazine.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

To avoid following the rules of the Code Comics Association, which severely restricted things like violence and kissing in comic books, Mad Comics was reborn as Mad Magazine in 1955.

The original portrait of Alfred E. Neuman, Mad’s mascot, painted by Norman Mingo.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

The original portrait of Alfred E. Neuman, Mad’s mascot, painted by Norman Mingo.

Neuman’s face first appeared on the cover of Issue #30 in March 1955. Prior to that issue, he had appeared in the pages of Mad under different names.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

Neuman’s face first appeared on the cover of Issue #30 in March 1955. Prior to that issue, he had appeared in the pages of Mad under different names.

In 1963, Mad parodied the Cold War with the comic
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

In 1963, Mad parodied the Cold War with the comic "East Side Story." (Click here to view larger)

Mad parodied the movie Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf with
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

Mad parodied the movie Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf with "Who in the Heck is Virginia Woolf?" Film critic Roger Ebert credited Mad movie spoofs like this one for teaching him how to watch movies with a critical eye. (Click here to view larger)

A comic from the August 2014 edition spoofing Russian president Vladmir Putin.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

A comic from the August 2014 edition spoofing Russian president Vladmir Putin.

Mad continues to skewer pop culture well into the 21st century. Here, Pharrell William’s hit song “Happy” is rewritten as “Appy,” making fun of the modern obsession with apps.
Courtesy of Mad Magazine

Mad continues to skewer pop culture well into the 21st century. Here, Pharrell William’s hit song “Happy” is rewritten as “Appy,” making fun of the modern obsession with apps. (Click here to view larger)

American Icons: Mad Magazine

From David Letterman to the writers of The Simpsons, generations of comedians and writers have grown up reading Mad Magazine. It changed the way we consume pop culture and the way we talk about world ...