Episode #735

Pessl, Playscripts, Christenberry

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Friday, September 01, 2006

Studio 360 Episode 735, Pessi, Playscripts, Christenberry Marisha Pessl (Laura Rose)

Kurt Andersen talks with Marisha Pessl about why her debut novel Special Topics in Calamity Physics is worth all the hype. Singer Vashti Bunyan tells us why she took a 30 year retreat from the music business. And the artist William Christenberry tells Kurt why he photographs the slowly morphing landscape of rural Alabama year after year.

Marisha Pessl

This summer, the literary world experienced a-star-is-born moment when 28-year old novelist Marisha Pessl's debut Special Topics in Calamity Physics received rave reviews and flew up the New York Times Best-Seller list. Kurt Andersen talks with Pessl about the inspiration behind her teenage heroine Blue Van Meer ...

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The Cost of Art

Why do paintings cost what they cost? Who makes the decision that one work of art sells for thousands or millions while another one sells for hundreds of dollars...or not at all? Sarah Elzas went looking for answers along New York's art gallery food chain, her first ...

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Playscripts

It used to be that if you were a playwright and you wanted to publish the script of your play, you had to go with one of two very old firms -- Samuel French or Dramatists Play Service. But now all of that's changed, thanks to a new company called ...

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Vashti Bunyan

In 1970, Vashti Bunyan thought she was on the verge of becoming a star. She hit the pop charts a few years back with a song penned by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. She poured her heart and soul into a debut album of folk music -- ...

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William Christenberry

William Christenberry returns every year to central Alabama near Tuscaloosa to chronicle the very slowly morphing rural landscape of his childhood: faded wooden barns, kudzu, covered buildings, dilapidated roadside markets with rusty signs and a certain old barbecue joint. Kurt asks Christenberry how he avoids cliches while ...

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