Episode #804

Cheever, Rotary Downs, Kaufman

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Friday, January 26, 2007

Studio 360 Episode 804, Cheever, Rotary Downs, Kaufman Susan Cheever (Courtesy of Susan Cheever)

Susan Cheever dishes the dirt about Emerson, Thoreau, and Louisa May Alcott in her new book, American Bloomsbury. We’ll revisit the cultural scene in New Orleans – where standup comedy has made an unlikely comeback, along with the indie rock act Rotary Downs. And we’ll see what Sasha Baron Cohen, Stephen Colbert, and Sarah Silverman owe to the surreal comedy genius Andy Kaufman.

American Bloomsbury

A tight-knit group of writers live and work together, animated by sexual electricity. The beautiful teenage novelist falls for an older poet who’s in love with another woman. The pioneering feminist journalist dies in a freak accident with her Italian lover, leaving behind a string of broken hearts. We’re talking ...

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New Orleans Comedy

In a city struggling to get back on its feet, the stand-up comedy scene in New Orleans is also making a surprising comeback. We sent Gregory Warner down to see what people are finding to laugh at.

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Rotary Downs

New Orleans is famous worldwide for its R&B, brass bands, piano players – not its indie rockers! The band Rotary Downs doesn’t sound like the New Orleans we’re used to, but their music still captures the anger and melancholy of the city now. They join Kurt in ...

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Andy Kaufman Comes of Age

Andy Kaufman's blend of comedy and performance art involved making up strange, annoying characters and staying in character, even beyond the walls of the TV studio. His routines bewildered audiences in the '70s and '80s. But with performers like Sasha Baron Cohen, Stephen Colbert and Sarah Silverman, the world has ...

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Billboard

In time-lapse photography, the bloom of a flower takes just seconds. Musician and computer programmer R Luke DuBois has developed the aural equivalent: time-lapse phonography. DuBois used the technique to condense Billboard's pop charts into a single piece of music: 42 years of #1 hits compressed ...

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