Episode #551

Microbes, Clones, Evolution

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Saturday, December 18, 2004

Kurt Andersen talks with novelist Margaret Atwood about how biology grabs headlines — and the imagination of artists. They discuss Atwood’s childhood among scientists, and her most recent novel, Oryx and Crake, in which biotech runs amok with catastrophic consequences.

Guests:

Margaret Atwood

Special Guest: Margaret Atwood

Kurt Andersen talks with novelist Margaret Atwood about how biology grabs headlines — and the imagination of artists. They discuss Atwood’s childhood among scientists, and her most recent novel, Oryx and Crake, in which biotech runs amok with catastrophic consequences.

The daughter of an entomologist, Margaret Atwood grew ...

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