Episode #435

Shahzia, Miniature, Microsound

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Saturday, August 30, 2003

Kurt Andersen and the playwright David Ives talk about the appeal of miniatures. Hamlet strides onto a tiny proscenium stage in your own living room, and an artist turns Indian miniature painting into something new and spectacular. Meanwhile, at the Minnesota State Fair, a contest winner is honored with her own portrait sculpted from a 90-pound block of butter.  

Guests:

David Ives

Commentary: Steal This Music

With the current crackdown on internet file sharing, Studio 360’s Kurt Andersen thinks this may be the beginning of the end of yet another cultural rebellion.

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Special Guest: David Ives

Kurt Andersen and playwright David Ives talk about how very tiny things capture the imagination.

David Ives is a playwright who's been called "the maestro of the short form" by The New York Times. He's probably best known for his one-act comedies including All in the Timing and Mere Mortals. ...

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Miniature Paintings

In India hundreds of years ago, tiny paintings the size of a leaf held political and social and spiritual meaning. Now, Shahzia Sikander, an artist in New York City, has taken the genre and turned it into something looser, but still small and jewel-like. Produced by Sarah ...

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Toy Theater

Before television and radio, many families used to gather around a 14-inch box set up on a table in their living room. They’d watch melodramas and action epics without electricity in the house. The box was a toy theater, made of cardboard, and it was an immensely popular item ...

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Microsound

Music made out of tones that you can't always hear — but you can feel. The artists who make microsound think that even minute sonic changes can affect us. We asked three composers — Dan Abrams, Steve Roden, and Taylor Deupree — to ...

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Dairy Princess

Every year the Minnesota State Fair names twelve young women “dairy princesses,” based on their knowledge of the dairy industry and the fact that they live on farms. Each of those princesses gets to step into a big Plexiglass refrigerator, sit in a winter coat on a ...

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