Episode #421

Bennett, Velazquez, Beach Boys

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Saturday, May 24, 2003

Studio 360 falls under the influence of the intoxicating Tony Bennett. The king of the crooners talks with host Kurt Andersen about how artists are shaped by their influences. They get an inside look at how Manet began a dialogue with his great inspiration, the Spanish painter Velazquez — who had been dead for two centuries. Judy Blume gives a generation of young girls some straight-talking literature. And a once obscure Beach Boys album becomes required listening for young indie rock musicians.

Guests:

Tony Bennett

Commentary: The Empire Reloaded

Earlier this month The Matrix Reloaded made the biggest debut ever for an R-rated film, and it’s still gathering steam. Studio 360’s Kurt Andersen couldn’t help but notice how it resembles another hugely profitable sci-fi movie series.

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Special Guest: Tony Bennett

Kurt Andersen and singer Tony Bennett talk about the power of influence and its effect on creativity.

Tony Bennett is one of the most revered jazz and pop singers of all time. He made standards out of "Blue Velvet," "I Left My Heart In San Francisco," and dozens more. His ...

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Manet/Velazquez

Sometimes an artist's inspiration can come from miles — and centuries — away. The Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibit, “Manet/Velazquez: The French Taste for Spanish Painting” shows how some great painters looked for ideas from artists who lived 100 years before them. Produced by Sarah Lilley.

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Judy Blume

There is scarcely a female in America under the age of thirty-five who didn’t have a section of her bedroom bookshelf devoted to the work of Judy Blume. Her books, like Are You There God It's Me Margaret and Then Again Maybe I Won’t, dealt frankly with things like puberty ...

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Pet Sounds

In 1966 — at the height of the Beach Boys' popularity — the band released a record called Pet Sounds. But their record label, Capitol, buried it because nobody knew what to do with its strange arrangements and harmonies. Then, in the 1990s Pet Sounds began building a new following ...

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