Episode #824

Creatures, Milch, McEwan

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Friday, June 15, 2007

Studio 360 Episode 824, Creatures, Milch, McEwan Bob and Kathy as bees on “Creature Comforts” (Courtesy of Aardman Animations)

Father's Day with a twist. Kafka meets Claymation when real-life parents are turned into bumble bees. Deadwood and Hill Street Blues creator David Milch says the shady real-life dealings of his own dad inspired several of his unsavory characters. And a toymaker's son has a soft spot for the 2-cent tchotkes his dad created for cereal boxes. Plus: novelist Ian McEwan on his new book, On Chesil Beach.

Bee-ing There

The CBS animated series Creature Comforts features the voices of real people in real conversations, set to various animals. Radio producer Lu Olkowski recorded her own parents, Bob and Kathy Olkowski, for the show. Kathy was hoping she and her husband would be represented as little clay lovebirds; ...

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David Milch

In the early 1980s, David Milch taught English literature at Yale. But then he submitted a script to the groundbreaking TV series Hill Street Blues. He went on to create NYPD Blue and HBO’s Deadwood. His new series, John from Cincinnati, premiered last week on HBO. Milch ...

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Ian McEwan

Ian McEwan's new novel is about young newlyweds who are so innocent and tongue-tied that they can’t get comfortable when it really matters - on their wedding night. Kurt talks to McEwan about On Chesil Beach, set in the early 1960s on the eve of the sexual ...

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Toymaker

Theo Zimmerman has one of those “cool dads” – especially cool if you’re about 6 years old: his father, Jack, designed toys. But he tended to keep them to himself. Produced by Theo Zimmerman.

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Silver Surfer

Spiderman, Superman ... do we really need another comic book action flick? Fans say the Silver Surfer isn’t your average superhero - he’s shinier. No one’s more excited about Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer than Judith Kampfner – she fell for him years ago.

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