Episode #835

Cheever, Handey, Suphala

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Friday, August 31, 2007

Studio 360 Episode 835, Cheever, Handey, Suphala Suphala (Farrel Duncan)

The secret lives of monkeys, giraffes, and sexy jungle explorers. Comedy writer Jack Handey reinvents the television nature documentary -- it’s not pretty. The young tabla master Suphala stops by the studio to perform, and trumpeter Terrence Blanchard composes music for a broken New Orleans.

American Bloomsbury

A tight-knit group of writers live and work together, animated by sexual electricity. The beautiful teenage novelist falls for an older poet who’s in love with another woman. The pioneering feminist journalist dies in a freak accident with her Italian lover, leaving behind a string of broken hearts. This was ...

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Podcasts for the People

Remember the old museum audio tours? The big clunky tape recorder slung over your shoulder, telling you to visit the artwork in a strict sequential order? Times have changed. Today’s audio equipment is elegant, like handheld wands with no cords to get tangled up in. And because it’s digital, you ...

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My Nature Documentary

The writer Jack Handey has been watching a lot of wildlife shows on TV. And he has some ideas to use show business techniques to help us better appreciate the wonders of nature.

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Hoberman Sphere

If you know any kids in grade school, you know this thing: it’s made of little plastic rods folded together into a spikey ball. When you pull out the segments, the Hoberman Sphere opens up into a big ball, three times its original size. And now a big ...

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Suphala

At 17, this American child of Bombay parents decided to take up the tabla, the traditional hand drums of Indian music. But in Suphala’s hands the tabla is not so traditional. She stopped by Studio 360 to demonstrate and perform. Her new album is called

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Terence Blanchard

One of many wrenching scenes in Spike Lee’s documentary When the Levees Broke is a man bringing his mother back to the horrible ruin of her home. The man is Terence Blanchard, a trumpeter and band leader. He also wrote the music for Spike Lee’s ...

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