Still Life Sells

Feature

Friday, January 04, 2008

Home furnishings catalogs have evolved over the past couple of decades into glossy, sumptuous celebrations of domestic life (minus the mess). They're a far cry from the fuzzy line drawings of a Sears catalog at the turn of the last century. But Judith Kampfner says that some of the eye popping splendor in current catalogs begins much longer ago than that: with the 17th century paintings of Dutch Still Life masters.

    Music Playlist
  1. Get Up, I'm Going Hunting
    Artist: Marion Verbruggen
    Album: Van Eyck: Der Fluyten Lust-Hof (Selections)
    Label: Harmonia Mundi Fr.
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Cariba
    Artist: Wes Montgomery
    Album: Full House
    Label: Riverside
    Purchase: Amazon

Contributors:

Judith Kampfner

Comments [2]

Andrea Silenzi from Studio 360

Yikes! Because some segments from this week’s show were taken from a past episode of Studio 360, the still life paintings and photos Kurt promised never made it into our slideshow. The good news it that I’ve tracked down some great websites you can visit for images associated with Judith Kampfner’s story. First of all, if you’d like to see pictures of modern food stylist Lisa Homa’s work, you should visit her website: http://www.lisahoma.com.
After that, if you’re interested in comparing what she’s doing to some of the 17th century Dutch paintings we discussed, I recommend visiting the wikimedia commons page for artist Willem Claeszoon Heda: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Willem_Claesz._Heda

Jan. 10 2008 12:11 PM
pamela Milholland from state college, pa

Very disappointed because I assumed you would have a visual display to download that coordinated with the audio.....was there something that I didn't do to possibly access a visual display that you are verbally discussing? Kindly notify me. Thanks. P. Milholland

Jan. 06 2008 08:52 PM

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