You're a Complicated Man, Charlie Brown

Interview

Friday, October 17, 2008

At its peak, over 350 million people around the world read the Peanuts comic strip. Its creator Charles Schulz led a much darker life than anyone ever realized, and he put his troubles into the funny pages every day. Kurt Andersen talks with Schulz's biographer, David Michaelis, about how America’s most beloved comic strip made “depressed” a household word.

    Music Playlist
  1. Great Pumpkin Waltz
    Artist: Vince Guaraldi
    Album: Oh Good Grief!
    Label: Warner Bros
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown
    Artist: Peanuts TV special
    Label: Paramount
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. A Charlie Brown Christmas
    Artist: Peanuts TV special
    Label: Paramount
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. You're Not Elected, Charlie Brown
    Artist: Peanuts TV special
    Label: Paramount
    Purchase: Amazon
  5. Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown
    Artist: Peanuts TV special
    Label: Paramount
    Purchase: Amazon

Guests:

David Michaelis

Comments [1]

arkonbey from Underhill, Vermont

I just got the Complete Peanuts 1950-1952 from the library last night (again). I find the first two years to be his best works. The characters had so much personality and seemed to occupy a real place. They are truly wonder cartoons.

Once the characters codified into the ones we know today, they became and stayed comparatively flat and boring. A peanuts strip from the 80's is virtually indistinguishable from one from the 60's. The first two years shine.

My favorite old one is the mashed potatoes/ice cream cone joke.

Oct. 22 2008 01:10 PM

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