Chinua Achebe

Interview

Friday, December 19, 2008

The author of Things Fall Apart has been called the father of a generation of writers. His enduring novel has been translated into 50 languages, has sold 10 million copies, and is required reading in countless high schools. Kurt asked Achebe to look back at what's happened in the fifty years since its publication.

More on Achebe's legacy: the young Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Adichie talks about how Achebe influenced her writing.

    Music Playlist
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Guests:

Chinua Achebe

Comments [1]

Joe Wesbrook from Albuquerque, NM

AHA Moment: The book that changed my life
In 1992, I picked up a book from a sale table, I don't even remember where, "Our Sustainable Table", edited by Robert Clark. It's a book on farming, food, cooking, and eating. In an essay by Wendell Berry he said (I'm paraphrasing), "If you don't know where your food comes from, you're an industrial eater." Flash--the light goes on! Not only do I not have a clue where my food comes from, I don't know what's in it, or anything about it. Berry wrote "...a platter covered with inert, anonymous substances that have been processed, dyed, breaded, sauced, gravied, ground, pulped, strained, blended, prettified and sanitized beyond resemblance to any part of any creature that ever lived." That book, that essay, changed the way I eat--I'm not a vegetarian or even close, and I'm not "catholic" in my tastes (peanut butter still reigns supreme) but that book started me on gardening, and I now garden and eat what comes from it, and I sell honey from my hives at the local farmers' market, where I can preach the gospel of "If you don't know where your food comes from...."

Mar. 22 2013 01:30 PM

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