A Sol LeWitt of One's Own

Feature

Friday, May 22, 2009

The late artist Sol LeWitt was famous for huge wall drawings created directly on the walls of a museum or a collector's home. When WNYC's Mark Phillips saw one, he decided to recreate it in his own apartment. But is it "real," or is it plagiarism?

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Contributors:

Mark Phillips

Comments [6]

username

The process of replication helps in understanding the essence / theory of that which you are replicating. It also allows you to explore some of the same limitations that were originally dealt with as well as the ability to apply your own ideas / ideals which may not have been represented in the original.

Sol LeWitt Variations of Incomplete Open Cubes
http://www.lhasatibet.com/sollewitt/

Roman Opałka 1965/1-∞
http://www.lhasatibet.com/romanopalka/

Jul. 05 2009 04:57 AM
Kirk Pillow from Washington, DC

People who enjoyed this piece might find interesting this article: “Did Goodman’s Distinction Survive LeWitt?,” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (2003): 365-380. When researching the essay in 2002, I executed wall drawing #91 in my living room. That house has since been sold and the drawing painted over.

Jun. 13 2009 10:36 AM
Christopher Albert from Beacon, NY

This segment is ironically timely as Dia:Beacon is hosting a series of professional development workshops for artists, the first section being held on June 27 covers copyright law.

Jun. 10 2009 07:32 AM
Martin Tusler from Oregon

I was delighted by this story. The exploration of the relationship between creation and commerce was fascinating. My favorite segment was when the gallery representative asked if the process had made you think. Clearly, you had thought about it far more than she had.

May. 23 2009 03:42 PM
brmilton from Omaha, NE

Great article. Really calls to question the relationships between creativity, "ownership", copyright, and profit. Thanks for that!

May. 23 2009 02:10 PM
t from NYC

Fantastic story, Mark! I never would have thought I would enjoy a story about "copying" a piece of art so much

May. 23 2009 11:02 AM

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