Chinua Achebe

Interview

Friday, July 10, 2009

He has been called the father of a generation of writers. First published at the dawn of Nigeria’s independence, Things Fall Apart has been translated into 50 languages, has sold 10 million copies, and is required reading in countless schools. Kurt Andersen asks Achebe if his novel foreshadowed his country’s difficulties.

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Guests:

Chinua Achebe

Comments [3]

Lauren

Let me clarify. Adichie does not pronounce the "g", which I understand is the proper pronunciation.

Jul. 15 2009 07:31 PM
Lauren

To piggy back off of the previous comment, Kurt pronounces the "g" in Igbo or Ibo. Chimamanda Adichie pronounces the name this way during her interview.

Thanks for an introduction to her. I will check out her novel!

Jul. 15 2009 06:43 PM
Sara from RI

This was an insightful and sensitive interview. It's a great time to look at how West African literature has helped the West learn about world issues.

However, in his concise synopsis of Achebe's, "Things Fall Apart," Kurt referred to the Ibo people as a "tribe." Achebe may have used the term "tribe" in his book in the 1960s, today the term has become highly contested and Achebe's book works to dispel the associations with that term.

Here is a link to the Africa Action website which explains why we, and esp the media, should avoid that term:
http://www.africaaction.org/bp/ethall.htm

Thank you for a wonderful episode and keep up the good work!

Jul. 12 2009 11:04 AM

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