Episode #1032

Warhol, Cale, Wilco

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Friday, August 07, 2009

John Cale John Cale (Colin Lane)

Studio 360 goes Pop. Andy Warhol would have turned 81 this week. He revolutionized the art world by making paintings out of Hollywood faces and stuff he found at the supermarket. Velvet Underground co-founder John Cale describes Warhol's influence on art, album covers, and a celebrity-obsessed culture he helped create. And later, Kurt talks with Wilco, the alt-country indie rock band unafraid to label their music "art."

American Icons: Warhol's Soup Cans

Andy Warhol told people he painted soup because he ate it for lunch every day, but the paintings remain mysterious more than 40 years later.

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Cale on Warhol

Andy Warhol did more than turn groceries into art - he also elevated an obscure band called The Velvet Underground to the rock pantheon. Band co-founder John Cale tells Kurt that Warhol didn't do it for the love of rock & roll. "I don't think he ...

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"Style It Takes"

Cale performs a song from Songs For Drella, the album he wrote with Lou Reed as a tribute to Warhol.

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Design for the Real World: Sticky Fingers

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister's favorite album cover of all time is one of Warhol's notorious designs: The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers, with the fully operational zipper. Produced by Derek John. And Cale reveals Warhol's inspiration for the Velvet Underground's signature banana cover.

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Wilco (The Interview)

With their seventh record, Wilco (The Album), Wilco has entered the self-referential phase of rock stardom. Back in 2004 the band stopped by to perform and talk with Kurt after the release of A Ghost Is Born. Jeff Tweedy told Kurt, ...

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