Aha Moment: Dances with Clay

Feature

Friday, September 04, 2009

In the 1950s, Paulus Berensohn, now 77, studied dance at Juilliard, performed on Broadway, and worked with modern dance legends like Merce Cunningham and Mary Anthony. Then, in his mid-20s, it occurred to him: what would it mean to dance, not just on the stage, but in life? He found the answer at a potter's wheel, and he's been there ever since. Produced by Studio 360's Jenny Lawton.

    Music Playlist
  1. Overture
    Artist: 1952 Original Broadway Cast
    Album: Three Wishes for Jamie
    Label: Drg
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Artist: John Cage
    Album: Sonatas and Interludes for Prepared Piano
    Label: Naxos American
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. Artist: John Cage
    Album: Six Melodies for Violin and Keyboard
    Label: New World Records
    Purchase: Amazon

Contributors:

Jenny Lawton

Comments [1]

Gene Caprioglio from Long Island City, NY

There was a music store in our neighborhood when I was a kid, and one evening my father noted that I was transfixed gazing at the instruments in the window. He asked if I wanted to play an instrument. I said - Yes, I want to play guitar. So in November of 1965 I started taking guitar lessons. My first teacher was John Savolainen, a jazz and big band guitarist. At first I was totally flummoxed. I do not have much talent for music, and it was really hard to make anything approaching music come out of the box with the strings attached. But we both persevered, and one day, maybe a year down the line, we played a written duet. John accompanied and I played the melody, everything clicked into place. Suddenly, the skies opened and I saw heaven for a moment. I've spent the rest of my life looking for those moments.

Sep. 05 2009 08:59 PM

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