Yoko Ono

Interview

Friday, October 02, 2009

Her signature howl made her brand of avant-garde music famous. But in recent years, Ono found mainstream success with five number one dance singles. Now, forty years after she founded the original Plastic Ono Band with her late husband, John Lennon, she's recording under the same moniker, with the couple's son, Sean. Ono tells Kurt what it's like to be embraced by a whole new generation of musicians and fans.

Guests:

Yoko Ono

Comments [4]

Fatma

If it weren't for her association with John Lennon, could she ever have dreamed of such fame? The artistry is shallow, the singing is out of tune. She's still capitalizing on how she simply represents an era.

Oct. 07 2009 01:44 AM
Helene Papageorge

I appreciate the fact that Yoko Ono remained true to her artistic sensibilities. She is willing to challenge and break societal notions and expectations of who and what a woman should be rather than who she is. I don't know if this makes sense.

Oct. 06 2009 12:09 AM
Stephen from NYC

This new recording has an excellent range of musical styles that Yoko Ono handles extremely well for a person of 76. With a great batch of musicians to back her up, she often uses her voice not so much as a "singer" but more as an additional instrument to describe a situation &/or feeling that can contradict sonorous expectations. Hence,many misinterpret her intentions as an artist/musician. But that's ok, too.

Oct. 03 2009 02:39 AM
Tom Richards from USA, Davidson, NC

Hmm...it's a comfort that not everything changes in this world. She sounds the same as before. And that's not good.

Oct. 02 2009 12:52 PM

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