Stewart Copeland

Interview

Friday, October 09, 2009

Sting may have been the front man, but drummer Stewart Copeland was the heartbeat of The Police. In his new memoir Strange Things Happen Copeland talks about how the band’s creative friction helped sell over 50 million records. And he blows the cover on his father, who raised the young Copeland in Beirut while spying for the CIA.

    Music Playlist
  1. Driven to Tears
    Artist: The Police
    Album: Zenyatta Mondatta
    Label: A&M
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Does Everyone Stare
    Artist: The Police
    Album: Regatta de Blanc
    Label: A&M
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. Police and Thieves
    Artist: Junior Murvin
    Album: Police and Thieves
    Label: Mango
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. Police & Thieves
    Artist: The Clash
    Album: The Clash
    Label: Sony
    Purchase: Amazon
  5. Roxanne
    Artist: The Police
    Album: Outlandos d’Amour
    Label: A&M
    Purchase: Amazon
  6. Walking on the Moon
    Artist: The Police
    Album: Regatta de Blanc
    Label: A&M
    Purchase: Amazon

Guests:

Stewart Copeland

Comments [4]

Terry from Antioch,Tn.

Thank you,Jenny!...Sorry for the whine...

Oct. 13 2009 06:29 PM
Jenny from Studio 360

Link up now -- sorry for the delay!

Oct. 12 2009 09:03 AM
Terry Jones from Antioch,Tn.

Ditto to the above! Copeland is an extraordinarily bright person.Can't wait to read the book (his brother Miles wrote a cool book about their childhood,as well as the whole starting IRS record label,the "biz",etc.).Thank you for all te VERY interesting profiles!

Oct. 11 2009 06:31 PM
Ken H from Half Moon Bay, CA

I've been looking for the additional minutes of the Stewart Copeland interview -- you know, the part advertised on the radio show to be found only on the Studio360 site?

Could you help us out as to its whereabouts? Thanks!

Ken H.

Oct. 11 2009 06:18 PM

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