G.I. Oboe

Feature

Friday, January 22, 2010

Last year classical musician Meredeth Rouse signed up for the U.S. Army Band. Alongside soldiers nearly half her age, she had to get comfortable with rifles, hand grenades, and chemical warfare. In the Army, even an oboist has to get through boot camp. Produced by Studio 360's Michele Siegel.

    Music Playlist
  1. The Army Goes Rolling Along
    Artist: The U.S. Army Band "Pershing's Own"
  2. The Thunderer
    Artist: The U.S. Army Band "Pershing's Own"
  3. Left, Right
    Artist: The Sun Harbor's Chorus
    Album: Running cadences of the US Armed Forces
    Label: Documentary Recordings
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. Metamorphoses (6) after Ovid, for oboe solo, Op. 49: Pan
    Artist: Performed by: Meredeth Rouse
    Album: Composed by: Benjamin Britten

Contributors:

Michele Siegel

Comments [4]

Arkonbey from underhill, vt

The DI called cadence? In the USCG after the first two weeks, the recruits call. Making up songs is fun, too.

I ended up being the cadence caller in my company (O-123). I also had to teach a buddy rhythm so that we wouldn't all have to do push-ups when he got out of step (two pants hanger rods held like drumsticks and a quick lesson in 4/4 time did the trick).

Jan. 27 2010 04:05 PM
Andy Trimpin from Baltimore

I got a kick out of her remarks about the sergeant who couldn't keep time while doing a cadence. It reminded me of my daughters (in the High School Band) who always complain that I can't keep time!

Jan. 23 2010 10:19 PM
Joshua Feltman

"Strangle a chicken for a cup of coffee?" I wouldn't want to be a chicken within arm's length of her...

Jan. 23 2010 06:51 AM
Roger Collins from Lehigh Valley, PA

A great interview. I appreciated Meredeth's story and her creative strategy to earn a livng doing what she loves. And I would buy her a cup of coffee if I ever ran into her. Makes me want to go to an Army Band Concert. Viva le oboist Meredeth!

Jan. 22 2010 08:59 PM

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