Episode #1119

Higdon, Pakistani Art, Allende

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Friday, May 07, 2010

Studio 360 Episode 1119, Higdon, Pakistani Art, Allende "Key to Paradise." In this self-portrait, Aijazuddin stands against a backdrop of tessellating geometric designs. These shapes are often used to decorate mosques where representations of living things (Komail Aijazuddin)

Kurt Andersen talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Jennifer Higdon. She says daydreaming is the first step in writing a great piece of music. Two young Pakistani artists aim to tell stories about Islam in a Western classical painting style. And Isabel Allende tells Kurt how she edits her manuscripts specially for her mother.

Jennifer Higdon

Jennifer Higdon recently won the Pulitzer Prize for her musical compositions, yet she didn't pick up a musical instrument - a pawn-shop flute her mother brought home - until she was fifteen. Higdon tells Kurt that her childhood home was more steeped in the Beatles than ...

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Isabel Allende

Today, no one would say that a woman can't be a writer. But when the Chilean-born novelist Isabel Allende was growing up, "writer" was not on the career menu. Kurt asks Allende about the path that led her to write fiction. Her newest novel, Island Beneath ...

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Zombie Nation

To make a convincing zombie, it's all in the pacing. George Romero invented the modern zombie with his 1968 film, "Night of the Living Dead," and he still likes them old-fashioned - slow-moving but hard to stop. But Ruben Fleischer, director of the ...

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Pakistani Painters

In the MFA program at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, artist Komail Aijazuddin and his friend from Lahore, Salman Toor, have done something they've never seen in Pakistan. They use the techniques from Western art to paint Islamic stories and Pakistani subjects. Produced by

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Ben Greenman & Swamp Dogg

Ben Greenman's book, Please Step Back, now out in paperback, appears to be a biography of the 1970s soul and funk legend Rock Foxx. But Foxx is totally imaginary. So Greenman teamed up with a real-life funk legend, Swamp Dogg, to release one ...

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