Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning”

Feature

Friday, November 19, 2010

Every year the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress selects 25 recordings to be preserved for all time. One song chosen this year is Howlin’ Wolf’s "Smokestack Lightning," a cornerstone of Chicago Blues. Howlin' Wolf's daughter and longtime guitarist Hubert Sumlin talk about the importance of his music. Produced by Ben Manilla Productions.

The Sounds of American Culture, our series highlighting works in the National Recording Registry, receives production support from the Library of Congress. 

Howlin’ Wolf performs “Smokestack Lightnin,” live in 1964.

    Music Playlist
  1. Smokestack Lightnin
    Artist: Howlin' Wolf
    Album: The Chess Box
    Label: Chess-MCA
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Crying at Daybreak
    Artist: Howlin' Wolf
    Album: Howlin' Wolf Sings the Blues
    Label: Ace Records UK
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. Ace Moon Going Down
    Artist: Charley Patton
    Album: Screamin' and Hollerin' the Blues
    Label: Revenant

Contributors:

Ben Manilla

Comments [2]

Charles Peterson from Oberlin, OH

As much as I respect the various giants of Blues music, it seems that Howling Wolf's stature only seems to grow and marvel at his work only seems to deepen. Thank you 360 for your hand in this.

Nov. 21 2010 09:56 PM
Roderick Woodruff from Columbia, MD

Thank you so much for your retrospective of this blues giant Howling Wolf. The recording of Smokestack Lighting has a well deserved place in the Library of Congress for generation yet to be. Best regards to you and your staff at Studio 360.

Nov. 20 2010 03:37 PM

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