Coal Miner's Daughter

Feature

Friday, December 03, 2010

Every year the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress selects 25 recordings to be preserved for all time. One song chosen this year is Loretta Lynn’s 1970 hit “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” which tells the story of growing up poor in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky. Lynn, Nashville veteran Harold Ray Bradley, and Jack White of The White Stripes explain what makes the song a classic. Produced by Ben Manilla and Devon Strolovitch for Media Mechanics.

The Sounds of American Culture, our series highlighting works in the National Recording Registry, receives production support from the Library of Congress.

    Music Playlist
  1. Coal Miner's Daughter
    Artist: Loretta Lynn
    Album: Loretta Lynn:The Definitive Collection
    Label: MCA Nashville
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Don't Come Home A-Drinkin
    Artist: Loretta Lynn
    Album: Loretta Lynn: The Definitive Collection
    Label: MCA Nashville
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. One's On The Way
    Artist: Loretta Lynn
    Album: Loretta Lynn: The Definitive Collection
    Label: MCA Nashville
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. Coal Miner's Daughter
    Artist: Sissy Spacek
    Album: Coal Miner's Daughter: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
    Label: MCA
    Purchase: Amazon

Contributors:

Ben Manilla and Devon Strolovitch

Comments [2]

Dana Johnson from Lakewood CA

I've loved Loertta Lynne since I first encountered country music as a 7-year-old playing with my sister's radio.l Glad to know the song is being archived by the Library of Congress.

Dec. 03 2010 06:39 PM
donna blaine from New Jersey

It has never been duplicated, they can try for her style, phrasing, but it just can't be done twice. It an original which makes it a classic, like classic literature and art.

Dec. 03 2010 06:05 PM

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