Simone Dinnerstein

Interview

Friday, December 03, 2010

Pianist Simone Dinnerstein tells Kurt about breaking into the classical musical world, topping the classical charts, and what it takes to make an iconic piece of music her own. She plays a selection from Bach's “Goldberg Variations” in studio. Dinnerstein’s next album, out in January, is called Bach: A Strange Beauty.

    Music Playlist
  1. Variation 3
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Simone Dinnerstein
    Album: Bach: Goldberg Variations
    Label: Telarc
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Variation 28
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Simone Dinnerstein
    Album: recorded live in Studio 360
    Label: recorded live in Studio 360
  3. Goldberg Variations: Variation 28
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Jacques Loussier Trio
    Album: from Jacques Loussier Trio: Bach's Goldberg Variations
    Label: Telarc
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. The Hallelujah Variation
    Artist: composed by Bach, arranged and composed by Uri Caine
    Album: from Goldberg Variations: Aria and 70 Variations
    Label: Winter & Winter
    Purchase: Amazon
  5. Variation 28 a 2 Clav, 1955
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Glen Gould
    Album: from A State of Wonder: The Complete Goldberg Variations (1955 & 1981)
    Label: Sony
    Purchase: Amazon
  6. Variation 28 a 2 Clav, 1981
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Glen Gould
    Album: from A State of Wonder: The Complete Goldberg Variations (1955 & 1981)
    Label: Sony
    Purchase: Amazon
  7. Nun freut euch, ihr lieben Christen, BWV 734, arr. Kempff
    Artist: composed by Bach, performed by Simone Dinnerstein
    Album: Bach: A Strange Beauty
    Label: Sony Classical
    Purchase: Amazon

Guests:

Simone Dinnerstein

Comments [3]

Carlos from LIC

I liked Simone's playing. Too bad it doesn't quite reach the level of Paul K's expectations. I suspect many things don't, and that is a shame.

Dec. 07 2010 12:43 PM
Dayle Ann Stratton from Vermont

I came online to thank you for this piece. I enjoy Gould's rendition of the Goldberg variations, but have always found them a little cold. I literally felt transported by Ms Dinnerstein's gentle interpretation, so much so that I found myself physically suspended as she played. I also found the discussion of the various ways the variations have found expression interesting (and the examples joyful). It led me to ponder how caught up in rigid "correctness" we can become. Music-- of all kinds-- doesn't need to be force fit into a predetermined mold to be valid. I am glad that Ms. Dinnerstein persevered in finding her own voice and was determined to share it with others. Congratulations to her.

I'm disappointed that the caustic mannerisms that seem so ubiquitous on forums these days have found their way here. One hopes that eventually these (clearly young; at least immature) people will mature enough to recognize that there are better ways of expressing one's thoughts, if thoughts are the right word.

Dec. 05 2010 05:31 PM
Paul K. from Brooklyn, NY

I was shocked at the amateur level of playing on your show today. The fact that this woman hood-winked someone into letting her on to your show was embarrassing enough but her playing was downright childish, her analysis bizarre. And to compare herself to Glenn Gould? What were you thinking?

Dec. 05 2010 02:59 PM

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