The Next Generation of Car Designers

Interview

Friday, December 31, 2010

Transportation Design (Tommy Tropodes)

At the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, instructors Tisha Johnson and Blair Taylor explain why car design has changed so little in the last 20 years. Kurt talks with students Ben Messmer and Lili Melikian about the prototypes they're working on. And Jim Heimann weighs in on the future of car design.

    Music Playlist
  • Jetson’s Theme
    Artist: Man or Astro-man?
    Album: Intravenous Television Continuum
    Label: Au-Go-Go Records
    Purchase: Amazon

Guests:

Jim Heimann, Lili Melikian and Ben Messmer

Comments [2]

a. listener from burlington VT

P. S. With the Aptera piece you acknowledged the sustainability issue. I didn't mean to suggest that you're overlooking it.

I'm looking forward to Studio 360 in 2011. Happy New Year!

Jan. 03 2011 01:59 AM
a. listener from burlington VT

Allure of the auto notwithstanding, we certainly do need think more about the sustainability of the automobile.

I'm wondering why it's overlooked that we use a 3000 lb. object to move a 150-200 lb. human being. Doesn't this sound like gross inefficiency to anyone? It seems to me car designers would be the first to realize and address this. R. Buckminster Fuller pointed this out more than 30 years ago yet in all that time how often have you heard it discussed--except by bicyclists?

And how convenient it is that sustainability is often in separate discussion from the ones about styling, appeal, and aesthetics.

Will we have an earth left to enjoy our cars on?

As the Chinese continue catching up with our own driving habits, think how sustainability will move toward the front burner. Except--surprise--the already excellent Chinese rail system now also incorporates the world's fastest trains.

We also need to hear much much more about WHY the automobile holds such a tenacious grip on our psyches.

other comments under:
"Low Riders"
"Aptera, Car of the Future"

Jan. 02 2011 08:46 PM

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