Godfather of Bacteria

Feature

Friday, December 24, 2010

In 1928 the Scottish biologist Alexander Fleming discovered the fungus from which penicillin is derived. Fleming made the discovery while trying an unusual experiment: painting with strains of bacteria. Lindsay Patterson talked with a team that’s taking bacterial painting to a new level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEO: Artist Amy Chase Gulden prints a bacterial painting.

    Music Playlist
  1. Woodland Sketches Op.51: To a Wild Rose
    Artist: Performed by Alan Mandel, Composed by Edward MacDowell
    Album: MacDowell: Piano Works
    Label: Phoenix USA
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Journal for People
    Artist: Takagi Masakatsu
    Album: Waltz
    Label: Phoenix USA
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. Sonata No. 2 (Eroica) Op. 50: Tenderly, Longingly, Yet With Passion
    Artist: Performed by Alan Mandel, Composed by Edward MacDowell
    Album: MacDowell: Piano Works
    Label: Carpark Records
    Purchase: Amazon
  4. Sonata No. 4 (Keltic) Op 59: With Naïve Tenderness
    Artist: Performed by Alan Mandel, Composed by Edward MacDowell
    Album: MacDowell: Piano Works
    Label: Phoenix USA
    Purchase: Amazon

Contributors:

Lindsay Patterson

Comments [1]

Ann from New Haven, CT

Loved the story--especially as one who was drawing (pastel) images of Ascomycetes (refrigerator mold) since 1989 because they are so colorful and organic, even though most people say "eeeeoooo" when they find such stuff in their fridge.

Felice Frankel, a photographer who works with scientists at MIT, takes shots of such things as growing bacteria. She has one image in white that looks much like the "flower" images of the e-coli.

I love your program!

Dec. 25 2010 08:01 AM

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