Ruin Porn : Slideshow

Friday, January 07, 2011

Waiting Room, Detroit
Andrew Moore
“Waiting Room, Detroit”

Detroit’s decaying architecture attracts photographers from around the world, and Michigan Central Station is the most frequently photographed site.

Model T HQ, Detroit
Andrew Moore
“Model T HQ, Detroit”

Moore spent 60 days photographing the architectural ruins in Detroit.  He says the bright green moss he saw carpeting the floors of Henry Ford’s old office at the former Ford Motor Company Headquarters reminded him of an aerial view of rice paddies in Indonesia.

Librarian, Detroit
Andrew Moore

“Librarian, Detroit” shows the librarian’s office of the former Mark Twain branch of the Detroit Public Library.

Walden Street, Detroit
Andrew Moore
“Walden Street, Detroit”
Organ Screen, Detroit
Andrew Moore
“Organ Screen, Detroit”
Romain Blanquart, Brian Widdis
Jennifer Guerra

Detroit photographers Romain Blanquart (left) and Brian Widdis (behind) grew frustrated with visiting photographers presenting the ruins of a dead city to the world.  They responded with the website “Can’t Forget the Motor City,” to draw attention to the people who live in Detroit, and are often absent from the ruin photos.

Cupid Shuffle, Detroit
Romain Blanquart/Can’t Forget The Motor City

Blanquart works in color, focusing on the people of Detroit.  “Cupid Shuffle” shows a summer blues jam in an abandoned lot locals call “John’s Carpet House.”

God Is Good (All The Time), Detroit
Brian Widdis/Can’t Forget The Motor City

Widdis works in black and white to record landscapes and surfaces.  This photograph is from the series “God Is Good (All The Time).”

Detroit ruin architecture, homesteading
Jennifer Guerra

Some artists attracted to Detroit’s ruin architecture decide to stay.  Blake Carroll unscrews the heavily boarded-up door to an old cigar factory he and fellow artist kt Andresky purchased for $21,000.

Detroit ruin architecture, homesteading, cigar factory
Jennifer Guerra

Andresky and Caroll want to use the old cigar factory (left) as an artist’s workshop, with a ceramics studio, dance floor, retail and office space, and apartments.

Detroit ruin architecture, homesteading, looking out
Jennifer Guerra
The two artists call the building World Headquarters, because as Andresky says, “We are all interested in world domination through the arts.”