"Power" Play

Tuesday, March 31, 2009 - 05:00 PM

All this talk in the news about government intervention in business got me thinking: why, in our free market economy, do we pretty much only have one choice for electricity? Arthur Arent’s 'Power' asks this question – and answers it too. 'Power' premiered in New York in 1937 and was one of the Federal Theatre Project’s Living Newspapers. These plays were retrospectives on contemporary issues, telling their tales by weaving together voices yanked from the headlines from more than 60 years ago.

The show, which ran for 140 performances in the 1930’s but hadn’t been revived since, has been taken on by the Metropolitan Playhouse in New York City. And the issues it raises are still shockingly relevant. The play’s detailed explanation of the structure of holding companies using a collection of large boxes was especially entertaining and enlightening.

'Power' runs at the Metropolitan Playhouse (220 East 4th Street) until April 12th.

Tags:

More in:

Comments [1]

Julie Burstein

We actually do have a choice of power -- last night at the Museum of Natural History's panel about health and the environment, a speaker said that one of the best ways to reduce our individual carbon footprint is to choose where we get our power from.

If you live in NYC, you can choose wind power or low impact hydro power from different providers - - here's the link: http://www.poweryourway.com/greenpower_escos.asp. Same thing in NJ, for PSEG, the link is: http://www.njcleanenergy.com/renewable-energy/programs/cleanpower-choice-program/new-jersey-cleanpower-choice-program.

The wind alternatives cost a few dollars more per month, but benefits are worth it.

Apr. 03 2009 07:09 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Supported by

Supported by

Feeds