Material Mashup: And the Winner is...

Listener Challenge

Friday, February 18, 2011

This month, in honor of the publication of Studio 360's book Spark: How Creativity Works, we asked listeners to show us how they made something creative from an unexpected combination of materials. Scores of projects poured in. They were so good, we chose three winners. Maurice Kenji Clark transformed his Jeep into a rhinoceroses — and then made a stop-motion animation movie of it roaming the wild. Ten-year-old Mary Elizabeth Greeley made an ingenious, kid-sized relaxation tub out of a cardboard box filled with hundreds of those styrofoam packing peanuts. And Franceska McCullough. Her eye-popping sculpture representing the orbits of the planets is made with hot glue and more than 20-thousand toothpicks.

The contest may be over, but you can still see listener entries and submit your own. We love seeing your mashups!

 

 

 

 

 

Slideshow: Winners and Finalists

Mary Elizabeth Greeley

10-year-old winner Mary Elizabeth Greeley created a kid-sized relaxation tub out of a cardboard box (reinforced with PVC pipe and duct tape) and tons of packing peanuts.

Franceska McCullough

Franceska McCullough’s winning sculpture used more than 20,000 toothpicks to create shapes inspired by the orbits of the planets and constellations.

Maurice Kenji Clarke

Maurice Kenji Clarke constructed this winning piece during his time in art school by using found objects to morph his '95 Jeep into a full-sized rhinoceros. He even made a stop-motion video of his creation "roaming the wilds" of metropolitan Indianapolis.

Esther E. Randall

Finalist Esther Randall's entry, a listener favorite, was inspired by the shapes her coffee grounds made at the bottom of her cup. She combined photos of the grounds to create “digital images of imaginary landscapes.”

Anne Percoco

To draw attention to the polluted state of the Yamuna River in India, finalist Anne Percoco connected more than 1,000 plastic water bottles and constructed this floating cloud sculpture, which she then used to circumnavigate the town of Vrindavan.

Mark Chason

Finalist Mark Chason sought to break his friends and neighbors out of the winter doldrums by taking menacing icicles off his roof and arranging them into a "forest" sculpture.

Melissa Rae Gagnon

Finalist Melissa Rae Gagnon was inspired by everyday objects in her house to craft this dog sculpture from an old inkwell and a handful of screws.

Caroline Armijo

This tobacco rug was created by finalist Caroline Armijo – in it, she summons memories of childhood days visiting her grandparents’ North Carolina tobacco farm. Recollections written on craft paper are woven into the cloth.

George J. Reitbauer

Art teacher and finalist George Reitbauer modeled this homemade nutcracker, made of clay and pig teeth, on a mechanical tree trimmer from his backyard.

Comments [2]

mjbarr from tennessee

regarding:
The current Republican delegation in Congress has the mind set of an old-time Fish Wife!

equating Republicans to Fish Wives is an insult to Fish Wives everywhere.

Feb. 22 2011 03:39 PM
Chris from Rhode Island

Your show is wonderful!

I just bought "Spark" & can't wait to start reading it!

This Material Mashup project is just fabulous! I think that an art & design education is one of the very best educations imaginable! Thank you for making an aspect of that rich kind of education available on the internet for ALL to participate in!

The arts, the humanities, creativity, NPR & PBS ...Too bad the Republicans are the Fairy Tale Wife who doesn't know that in her anger and impatience with him, that she is talking with the Magic Fish who will make her & her family RICH!

The arts, humanities, NPR, PBS ... they are all Economic Engines -- not only do they bring in money thru pledging, but they create spending and jobs in the private sector due to what we learn about, due to one interest leading to another, etc.

The current Republican delegation in Congress has the mind set of an old-time Fish Wife!

Feb. 20 2011 01:45 PM

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