Charleston Remembers the War : Slideshow

Friday, April 08, 2011

Kerrie Hillman

In Charleston, South Carolina, Jeannette Gaillard-Lee weaves baskets as a way to commemorate her ancestors who worked on nearby plantations.

Kerrie Hillman

Jeannette Gaillard-Lee completed the basket on the left - the one on the right was made by her mother. The craft was brought over by her ancestors from Africa, and has been passed down through her family over generations.

Kerrie Hillman

Tools of Gaillard-Lee's trade.

Kerrie Hillman

Randy Burbage, the President of the Confederate Heritage Trust – which preserves battlefields and artifacts of the Confederacy – kneels in front of the Charleston grounds where the Battle of Secessionville was fought in the summer of 1862. His great, great-grandmother's younger brother was killed in the battle.

Kerrie Hillman

Today, the grounds of the Battle of Secessionville are nestled in the middle of a residential neighborhood, barely visible to passers-by. It is often a struggle to keep kids from climbing on, or riding their bikes over, what remains of the fort. 

Kerrie Hillman

Randy Burbage stands next to a monument honoring the soldiers who fell at the Battle of Secessionville. At the end of the battle, there were 200 Confederate casualties, 50 of whom died that night.

Kerrie Hillman

Joseph Riley, who was raised in Charleston and now serves as Mayor of the city, remembers childhood visits to Fort Sumter and the view of the picturesque steeples that characterized the Charleston skyline.