Aha Moment: Antonio Machin

Feature

Saturday, January 13, 2001

Novelist Susanna Moore author of My Old Sweetheart, In the Cut, and The Whiteness of Bones, finds inspiration in the music of 1940s Cuban singer Antonio Machin.

Guests:

Susanna Moore

Comments [2]

JIM SAGER from WASHINGTON DC

My aha moment was the selection of a film several years ago in a hotel, Peter Weir's 1993 movie Fearless, loosely based on the 1989 Sioux City Iowa disaster of Flight 232, where half survived, half perished, largely based on the serendipity of where they were sitting when the plane, heroically crash-landed by its pilots broke in pieces on impact. Peter Weir's direction is masterful, Maurice Jarre's scoring transcendent. But the acting and relationship of Jeff Bridges and Rosie Perez is some of the best acting of our generation. Perez's character Carla loses her son when she momentarily sets him aside right before impact. Plagued by survivor's guilt, she basically shuts down and is inconsolable. Bridges' character Max Klein literally walks away from the crash, feeling exalted and almost omnipotent. It soon becomes obvious that he is in denial of his feelings. An airline psychiatrist pairs Carla and Max together in one of the earliest and best screen portrayals of PTSD. I have a feeling this raw film would be immensely therapeutic to returning veterans. The most beautiful thing about this movie is the deep and protective love Carla and Max feel for each other. Never experiencing intimate relations, I have seldom seen such a beautiful depiction of man-woman love. When the plane crashes, and sunlight illumines the path to his escape, Max experiences literally the aphoristic "tunnel of light" associated with near-death experiences. Weir incorporates cultural references from New Age folklore to Dante and Hieronymous Bosch pathfinding a way of illumination through the framing cyclone of life. Carla and Max's healing love and shared experience leads them eventually to reconciliation with their respective spouses. Perez was nominated for an Oscar, and Bridges is so underrated, but the Dude here imminently abides. This movie must go in the Library of Congress archive of greatest films of all time

Mar. 13 2014 01:55 PM
JIM SAGER from WASHINGTON DC

My aha moment was the selection of a film several years ago in a hotel, Peter Weir's 1993 movie Fearless, loosely based on the 1989 Sioux City Iowa disaster of Flight 232, where half survived, half perished, largely based on the serendipity of where they were sitting when the plane, heroically crash-landed by its pilots broke in pieces on impact. Peter Weir's direction is masterful, Maurice Jarre's scoring transcendent. But the acting and relationship of Jeff Bridges and Rosie Perez is some of the best acting of our generation. Perez's character Carla loses her son when she momentarily sets him aside right before impact. Plagued by survivor's guilt, she basically shuts down and is inconsolable. Bridges' character Max Klein literally walks away from the crash, feeling exalted and almost omnipotent. It soon becomes obvious that he is in denial of his feelings. An airline psychiatrist pairs Carla and Max together in one of the earliest and best screen portrayals of PTSD. I have a feeling this raw film would be immensely therapeutic to returning veterans. The most beautiful thing about this movie is the deep and protective love Carla and Max feel for each other. Never experiencing intimate relations, I have seldom seen such a beautiful depiction of man-woman love. When the plane crashes, and sunlight illumines the path to his escape, Max experiences literally the aphoristic "tunnel of light" associated with near-death experiences. Weir incorporates cultural references from New Age folklore to Dante and Hieronymous Bosch pathfinding a way of illumination through the framing cyclone of life. Carla and Max's healing love and shared experience leads them eventually to reconciliation with their respective spouses. Perez was nominated for an Oscar, and Bridges is so underrated, but the Dude here imminently abides. This movie must go in the Library of Congress archive of greatest films of all time

Mar. 13 2014 01:55 PM

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