Episode #312

Tech, Glitch, Typeface

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Saturday, March 23, 2002

Kurt Andersen and MIT Media Lab Scientist and composer Tod Machover untangle the crossed wires of art and digital technology, with stories about legendary dancer Merce Cunningham's embrace of computers to choreograph his new work, a musical art form constructed entirely from electronic glitches, and writers, film editors, and designers who love — and hate — how computers have changed their crafts. And graphic designer Michael Bierut explains what irks him about the typefaces he sees in the movies.

Guests:

Tod Machover

Commentary: Who's the new Brahms?

Kurt wonders what contemporary composers will become the future cannon — and why we don't know their names.

(Originally aired: January 10, 2002)

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Design for the Real World: Typeface

This Oscar weekend, graphic designer Michael Bierut proposes a new award the Academy should give out — a statuette for typefaces.

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Composer Tod Machover on Digital Art

Kurt Andersen and composer and MIT Media Lab scientist Tod Machover talk about the convergence between art and digital technology.

Machover is a composer and Professor of Music & Media at MIT's Media Laboratory. His music uses highly eclectic combinations of electronic and acoustic sound, and his compositions have been performed around the ...

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Glitch Music

Producer Steve Nelson looks at electronic music taken to the extreme: it uses only computer-generated beeps and hums.

(Originally aired: June 9, 2001)

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Merce Cunningham's Digital Dance

The 82-year-old modern dance master Merce Cunningham describes what happened when he began choreographing on a PC.

(Originally aired: June 9, 2001)

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Analog or Digital?

WNYC's Sara Fishko spotlights a writer, a film editor, and a graphic designer who admit their ambivalent relationships to technology.

(Originally aired: June 9, 2001)

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Typing Explosion

Three Seattle women improvise and write poems collectively, in costume, on-demand, and on-stage with props that include typewriters, horns, bells, and whistles.

(Originally aired: June 9, 2001)

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