Episode #334

Repetition, Lists, Exercise Record

« previous episode | next episode »

Saturday, August 24, 2002

We consider the art of repetition — from dance routines to infectious beats. It's what movie sequels have in common with the seamless loops of electronic music. Kurt Andersen and hip-hop musician Guru talk about why so much of the creative process relies on repetition. 

Guests:

Guru

Commentary: I Can't Resist a List

It seems that every week there's a new "Best of" or "Top 100" list about the arts. Studio 360's Kurt Andersen tries to explain why we're fascinated by lists. "Greatest" lists are, of course, ludicrous undertakings. They're also completely irresistible.

(Originally aired: May 9, 2002)

Comment

Now Playing: Convergence

One recent Sunday in New York, composer Neely Bruce brought together six marching bands, a dozen choruses, a West African Drumming Ensemble, Javanese Gamelan, West Indian Steel Drums, bagpipers, and a fife and drum corps. Jeff Lunden was there for this afternoon of organized chaos.

Comment

Guru on Repetition

Kurt Andersen and hip-hop artist Guru talk about how repeating words, images, and sounds draws us into a piece of art.

Guru (aka Keith Elam) is a rapper, composer, and musical chameleon. He is the lyrical half of the hip-hop duo Gang Starr and over the last two decades he’s ...

Comment

Repetition, Art, and the Brain

What exactly is going on in our brains when we feed it the same thing over and over?

(Originally aired: February 14, 2002)

Comment

Music Hooks

For centuries composers and musicians have been engaged by repetition. WNYC music host John Schaefer joins Kurt and Guru in the studio, to play them some examples.

(Originally aired: February 14, 2002)

Comment

Trisha Brown

Trisha Brown is a modern dance choreographer whose focus has changed over the past 30 years, but she continues to return to some of the same gestures and ideas.

(Originally aired: February 14, 2002)

Comment

The Exercise Record

You want repetitions? How about 15 thigh squats a minute, set to military music.

(Originally aired: February 14, 2002)

Comment

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.