Episode #1308

Hollywood’s Oscar Problem & Blondes on Film

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Friday, February 24, 2012

Michelle Williams as Marilyn Monroe in the film My Week With Marilyn Michelle Williams as Marilyn Monroe in the film My Week With Marilyn (Laurence Cendrowicz / The Weinstein Company)

Why is pop culture obsessed with blondes? From Marilyn Monroe to Rihanna, we look at the seductive power of golden locks. And on Hollywood’s biggest weekend, we ask, do the Oscars matter anymore? Plus Kurt Andersen gets a tour of the dozens of birds, plants, antiques, and oh yeah, paintings, in artist Hunt Slonem’s Manhattan studio.

Are the Oscars Hurting Hollywood?

While it's become an annual rite to complain about the Oscars, aside from the Super Bowl, more Americans still watch the Academy Awards than any other TV show. But according to agent and producer Gavin Polone, Hollywood's biggest night may be hurting the movie industry ...

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No Really, It's an Honor to be Nominated

When it comes to the Oscars, cynicism is in vogue — unless, of course, you’re a first time nominee. Andrew Bowler and Gigi Causey are the director and producer of the comedy Time Freak, which is nominated this year for best live action short. They're also a married couple ...

Video: A scene from Time Freak

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The Mad Women of Madison Avenue

Mad Men lets its viewers revel in the glamour of the 1960s while still pointing a finger at the era’s backwardness — particularly when it comes to the treatment of women. But is Mad Men exaggerating? Not so much, says advertising veteran Jane Maas. In her new memoir Mad Women ...

Video: Peggy and Joan on Don's Engagement on Mad Men

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Hollywood's Blonde Obsession

In the movies, blonde is more than just a hair color. “In the mind of the moviegoing male,” says film critic Rafer Guzman, “the blonde is something that you own, that you want to own. She represents something that you’re going to attain … like an expensive watch ..."

Slideshow: Blondes — From Mary Pickford to Rihanna

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Hunt Slonem's Artist Aviary

Manhattan’s West Side has plenty of artist studios, but none quite like Hunt Slonem’s. Kurt Andersen recently dropped by the artist’s eccentric space, which is housed on the third floor of a football field-sized warehouse. It’s stuffed with plaster busts, chandeliers, neo-gothic furniture ...

Video: Kurt Andersen visits Hunt Slonem's studio

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Aha Moment: Gravity's Rainbow

Gerald Joyce is a professor of biochemistry at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. In the 1970s, he was studying biochemistry at The University of Chicago, when he discovered Gravity's Rainbow, the sprawling World War II novel by Thomas Pynchon ...

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Comments [5]

Bryce from Iowa

Frank, the song after the Hunt Slonem piece was "Self Portrait with Electric Brain" by Stereolab.

Mar. 19 2012 06:46 AM
JR from Bklyn

Re: Music

It's Quincy Jones. See Link.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiIorPa_cNI
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Feb. 26 2012 11:54 AM
brian from woodbury, mn

what is the name of the song after the mad men bit- kind of 1960's jazzy?

Feb. 26 2012 07:32 AM
Frank D. McDermott from Arlington Va.

What is the name of the bump tune at the end of the Hunt Slonem piece? Thanks....I enjoyed the entire show especially the "Mad Women of Madison Avenue".

Feb. 25 2012 05:25 PM
Richard Adelman from Philadelphia

The problem I have with the Oscars is the difficulty I have comparing films across genres. It's hard to compare a comedy to a drama. Even within broad genres, it's hard to compare a sentimental story with an ironic one. So if there is a comedy, a drama, a fantasy, and a science fiction up together for best picture, it's like comparing apples and oranges. Therefore, I would improve the Oscars by giving awards within genres--like Best Comedy and Best Drama--or maybe in a number of sub-genres--Best Action Film, Best Fantasy, Best Surrealistic Story With Satirical Subtext...

Feb. 25 2012 07:25 AM

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