Episode #1309

Kickstarter & A Kids' Book About Meth

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Friday, March 02, 2012

Jacqueline Woodson, author of Beneath a Meth Moon Jacqueline Woodson, author of Beneath a Meth Moon (Marty Umans)

Acclaimed young-adult novelist Jacqueline Woodson tells Kurt Andersen that teens are ready to read about drug addiction. Arts funding in the age of Kickstarter: a co-founder of the online crowd-funding platform believes it will soon eclipse the NEA — we’ll weigh the pros and cons of Kickstarter compared to government funding. And a scientist’s new theory unites biology, physics, and design, explaining why everything that moves forms certain familiar patterns. It’s the constructal law, and it’ll change the way you see the world.

Can Kickstarter Fund Art Better than the NEA?

Last week one of Kickstarter's founders bragged that he expected the three-year-old crowd-funding site to give more money to the arts this year than the National Endowment for the Arts. That caught Clay Johnson's eye. The author of The Information Diet examined the numbers ...

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Jacqueline Woodson: Beneath a Meth Moon

Jacqueline Woodson is one of the most successful writers of young adult lit working today. But her books aren’t about vampires or rich girls. The winner of three Newbery Awards, Woodson deals with tough subjects. Her latest novel, Beneath a Meth Moon, tackles drug addiction ...

Bonus Track: Jacqueline Woodson reads from Beneath a Meth Moon

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Constructal Law: A Theory of Everything

Over the last 16 years, the mechanical engineer Adrian Bejan, now a professor at Duke University, has been working on a theory for how the world works. It’s a theory of everything: how living creatures are shaped, how lava flows down mountains. It’s called the constructal law ...

Comments [25]

Pico Iyer's Fascination with Graham Greene

Graham Greene wrote more than two dozen novels between the 1920s and the 1980s — downbeat bestsellers set in sketchy places. Writer Pico Iyer has felt an almost mystical connection to Greene, whom he never met. He chronicles that obsession in The Man Within My Head ...

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Aha Moment: Sullivan's Travels

Daniel Eagan knew from a young age that he wanted to pursue a career in film. The movie he credits with setting him on that path, Preston Sturges’ Sullivan’s Travels  (1941), also gave him nightmares. The movie is about a disgruntled director named John Sullivan. Fed up ...

Video: A scene from Sullivan’s Travels

Comments [1]

Comments [2]

Jenny from Studio 360

Hi James -- That's the theme from "The Third Man" -- here's the recording we used: http://www.amazon.com/Original-Motion-Picture-Soundtrack-Version/dp/B006MXSJOI

Mar. 04 2012 12:02 PM
James

Anybody know where I can find a list of the music played in this episode? Specifically the tune at the end of the Pico Ayer piece. Thx

Mar. 04 2012 01:13 AM

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