Episode #1319

Maurice Sendak & Filmmaker Mark Duplass

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Friday, May 11, 2012

Detail from the cover of 'Where the Wild Things Are' by Maurice Sendak Detail from the cover of Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak (Maurice Sendak)

Acclaimed children's book author Mo Willems (Knuffle Bunny) considers Maurice Sendak’s legacy.  Kurt Andersen talks with Mark Duplass, the actor/director/writer/producer who is giving 30-something slackers the spotlight.  The music industry taps hackers for the next killer app. And Pulitzer Prize-winner Tracy K. Smith reveals the winner of our Ode to a Teen Idol poetry contest.

→ Spotify Playlist: Listen to the music used in this week's show

Mo Willems Remembers Maurice Sendak

Best known for his breakthrough 1963 picture book Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's long career involved one wild rumpus after another. "You have to remember, he's from a generation where picture books were considered trash," says Mo Willems, an acclaimed author ...

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Hackers Try to Save the Music Industry

At the Rethink Music conference in Boston last month, programmers, developers, and tinkerers showed up for a 24-hour coding frenzy — a hackathon — at Microsoft’s New England Research and Development (NERD) Center, vying to make the coolest app that could transform music. ...

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Filmmaker Mark Duplass: The Anti-Slacker

A new kind of leading man has taken hold in Hollywood: the lovable loser. Together with his brother Jay, Mark Duplass has written and directed smart, affecting comedies about these losers.  His new film Jeff, Who Lives at Home stars Jason Segel as a 30-year-old stoner settled in to his ...

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Winner: Ode to Justin Timberlake

Inspired by Tracy K. Smith's Pulitzer Prize-winning tribute to David Bowie, we asked for your poem about the rock star or other teen idol who captured your imagination — as a teenager or now.  Smith is back into the studio to pick a winner.

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The Sights and Sounds of Concert Halls

In the last decade, concert hall construction has been booming.  And according to architectural historian Victoria Newhouse, these buildings are changing our experience of live music in unexpected ways.  She and Kurt visit Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center in Manhattan. Built in 1969, the hall ...

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This Week's Playlist

Here's the music we used in this week's show, via Spotify:

(Click here for a larger player.)

Comment

Comments [1]

Jordan Lampert from Ludwigshafen, Germany

Maurice Sendak wrote magical children's books...for adults. I loved reading his books to my kids. They, however, were not thrilled. But, if we are talking about the darkness in children's literature, for sheer terror, for childhood trauma, nothing beats Beatrix Potter's, The Tale of Samuel Whiskers -or- The Roly Poly Pudding. Just ask my son, who told me this about 5 years ago. He is now 27. And for absolute wierdness, how about Bullfrog Grows Up by Rosamond Dauer

May. 13 2012 11:22 AM

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