Playing Doctor

Feature

Friday, May 18, 2012

Sandra Oh and Ellen Pompeo in Grey's Anatomy Sandra Oh and Ellen Pompeo in Grey's Anatomy (Peter Hopper Stone / ABC)

Television drama has created the impression of an ideal world where decisions in hospitals are made quickly and cost is never an issue. It directly affects our expectations for treatment, according to Billy Goldberg, an emergency-room physician, and Joseph Turow, the author of Playing Doctor: Television, Storytelling and Medical Power

(Originally aired: December 10, 2010)


 

 

 

 

 

Video: A scene from the Scrubs episode "My Musical"


    Music Playlist
  1. Ben Casey theme
    Artist: The Tony Hatch Orchestra
    Album: The Avengers and other Top 60's TV themes
    Label: Castle Music
    Purchase: Amazon
  2. Theme from St. Elsewhere
    Artist: 20th Century Masters: The Best of Dave Grusin
    Album: The Best of Dave Grusin: The Millenium Collection
    Label: Hip-O
    Purchase: Amazon
  3. Superman (theme from Scrubs)
    Artist: Lazlo Bane
    Album: Soundtrack
    Label: Hollywood Records
    Purchase: Amazon

Contributors:

Eric Molinsky

Comments [1]

meredith from brooklyn, ny

In medical school i was never taught the 'art' of medicine or given the opportunity as a resident to write and share about how my emotions come to play in my patient care. i'm not so sure it's something teachable. different people and different doctor are more or less in touch with their feelings, have the ability or don't have the ability to truly empathize or connect with other people. i think i'm one of the people (and doctors) who have that ability and whose emotions and connections with patients has enhanced my effectiveness as a physician and hopefully touched patients in a significant way. i just think that's who i am, and so are the students that take the profiled class, which i'm sure was optional.

May. 20 2012 02:49 PM

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