Episode #104

Shakespeare, Drake, Sandman

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Saturday, November 25, 2000

Kurt Andersen and special guest theater producer and director George C. Wolfe talk about Shakespeare’s influence on contemporary culture, from Neil Gaiman’s graphic novel, “Sandman,” to the syllabus at business school. We’ll explore the emotional impact of pictures and the advertising-induced revival of 70s songwriter Nick Drake.

Commentary: TV or Advertising?

Kurt looks at the increasingly blurred boundaries between advertising and content on television. 

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It's Back

Washington Post music critic Tim Page illustrates how a Volkswagen ad inspired a revival of the late 1970s songwriter Nick Drake.

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How Art Works: Picturing Emotion

Writer and illustrator Molly Bang describes how pictures trigger our emotions.

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Shakespeare and Sandman

Shakespeare’s influence in the comic book novel Sandman, by British author Neil Gaiman.

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Harold Bloom

Kurt talks with critic Harold Bloom, author of “Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human.”

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Sonnets

Royal Shakespeare Company actors talk about their favorite Shakespeare sonnets.

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Power Plays

The authors of “Power Plays: Shakespeare’s Lessons in Leadership and Management,” Columbia Business School professor John Whitney and theater director Tina Packer, explain what business executives can learn from Shakespeare

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Sound Portrait: Midsummer in the Key of Dreams

An “ad-rap-tation” of Shakespeare by high school students from the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music. 

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Special Guest: George C. Wolfe

George C. Wolfe is Producer of the Joseph Papp Public Theater and the New York Shakespeare Festival. The acclaimed director of such Broadway hits such as “Angels in America,” “Jelly’s Last Jam,” and “Bring in ‘Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk,” Wolfe has been honored with several Tony and Obie ...

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