Episode #1439

Linda Ronstadt & Leaves of Grass

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Linda Ronstadt Linda Ronstadt (Courtesy of The Agency Group)

Walt Whitman loved America — so much so that it got a little creepy sometimes. But he accomplished his goal, writing a new Bible for American poetry to reflect the democracy and diversity at the heart of this country, and we explore Leaves of Grass in an episode of American Icons. Kurt talks with Linda Ronstadt about being a generation’s most beloved singer, and the disease that made her retire. Plus, we’ll get creative with drones that don’t spy or kill: they dance.

Linda Ronstadt's Curtain Call

Few pop singers have been as successful, as durable, and as wide-ranging as Linda Ronstadt. She was a country-rock ingénue in the late 1960s, a pop mainstay in the 1970s, and then in the '80s, when she might have gone stale, she sang opera, operetta, mariachi, country and bluegrass harmonies ...

Linda Ronstadt's 3 for 360

Comments [3]

Drone Art

Movies and TV are absorbing drones (or unmanned aerial vehicles as they are properly called) as plot devices in The Bourne Legacy and Homeland, for example. But some fine artists are also trying to sway this national conversation. Adam Harvey designs burqas and hijabs that make the wearer invisible ...

Video: Dancing with Robots

Comments [1]

Making Friends with Drones

Missy Cummings saw the dawn of the age of drones — sorry, “unmanned aerial vehicles” — firsthand from the deck of an aircraft carrier. As one of the Navy's first female fighter pilots, flying an F-18, Cummings realized that improvements in GPS were going to obviate her job. So she switched gears ...

Comments [2]

American Icons: Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman set out to invent a radically new form of poetry for a new nation. His book was first viewed as bizarre and obscene — one reviewer said that the author should be publicly flogged. But revising and adding to the book until his death, Whitman accomplished his goal, creating a new Bible for American poets.

Slideshow: The changing editions of Leaves of Grass

Comments [9]

My American Icon: Slaughterhouse-Five

In American Icons, we explore works of art that help us understand our nation, and what it means to be an American. From Richard Wright's Native Son to Cole Porter's "Anything Goes," these classics have endured because they deal with issues we still care about today. What works of art ...

Help us choose the next American Icon

Comments [1]

Paul T. Kijewski from Cleveland, Ohio

Good Day!

I heard your broadcast concerning the Minnesota Orchestra. I find it hard to believe that people who have been offered sa base salary of over a $100,000 year feel like they are underpaid. These musicians should try living in the REAL world. Big egos and a lack of common sense make for a bag combination.

Jan. 12 2014 03:42 PM

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