Episode #1501

Nirvana’s Nevermind & Kerry Washington

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Friday, January 03, 2014

American Icons Nirvana's Nevermind

This week in our American Icons series, we take a look at Nirvana’s Nevermind — was it rock and roll’s last hurrah? Golden Globe nominee Kerry Washington shows her mean streak as the star of Scandal. And Jesmyn Ward relives the trauma of Hurricane Katrina in her novel Salvage the Bones.

(Segments in this week's episode aired previously.)

Kerry Washington Fixes Everything

The television show Scandal started off as a fairly realistic procedural/soap opera. It stars Kerry Washington as Olivia Pope, a D.C. lawyer-media-consultant -super fixer who makes clients' problems go away. The character is based on Judy Smith, who served in the first Bush White House ...

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American Icons: Nirvana's Nevermind

In April, the band Nirvana is being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame — it’s been 25 years since the release of their first album, a gnarly piece of late punk called Bleach. But it was their second album, from 1991, that made them famous. It was angry and bracingly cynical ...

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Jesmyn Ward: Waiting for Katrina

Jesmyn Ward was an unknown novelist when her second book, Salvage the Bones, won the National Book Award in 2011. She’s recently written a memoir called The Men We Reaped that ended up on a lot of best-of 2013 lists. Both books look at the rough parts of life in a small town ...

Bonus Track: Jesmyn Ward reads from Salvage the Bones

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Aha Moment: The Dream Syndicate

For 20 years, Sam Coomes has led the band Quasi along with the drummer Janet Weiss, carrying the torch for a punk music that’s relevant, funny, and hard-hitting well into middle age. Coomes was born in Texas and moved with his family to southern California, which is where he found his calling ...

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