Episode #1519

Seth Rogen Grows Up & Critics with Attitude

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Friday, May 09, 2014

(Left to right) Zach Efron, Seth Rogen, and Rose Byrne in Neighbors (Left to right) Zach Efron, Seth Rogen, and Rose Byrne in Neighbors (Glen Wilson)

Kurt Andersen talks with Seth Rogen, whose amiably foul-mouthed man-boy characters have transformed American comedy, about finally writing a decent role for a woman. (Hint: It helps to be married.) And a new study ranks movie critics from harsh to gushy; Kurt asks one of the hatingest critics why so many movies are overrated. Plus, Lydia Davis, whose short stories are so short they’re sometimes one-liners.  

The Movie Critic Who Hates Movies

A lot of movie critics have a reputation for being cranky, but who is the crankiest? A new study uses Metacritic data to find out. One of the top haters, Kyle Smith of the New York Post, explains why his less-discerning peers overrate so many movies.

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Team Work Makes the Dream Work

One of our listeners, Gabriel Walker, made a New Year’s resolution to kick his music career into a higher gear. His biggest step: moving from a tiny town in Kentucky to the richer music and nightlife scene in Louisville. He visited Louisville to scope out his prospects and meet his long-distance songwriting partner in person.

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A Century of Blues

W.C. Handy was the first to publish a body of songs identified as blues, based on lyrics and melodies from black Southern culture, that became known throughout America. Two of his biggest hits, “St. Louis Blues” and “Yellow Dog Blues,” were published in 1914, making the year a turning point in the history of the blues.

Enter the 1914 Blues Challenge

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Seth Rogen Learns that Women Can Be Funny

Seth Rogen has built a career playing overgrown adolescents. But in his new movie, Neighbors, he’s a new father who just wants to get some sleep. Does that mean Rogen has left man-childish things behind? Hardly, as the movie’s escalating prank war and copious drug use attest.

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Lydia Davis: Master of the Miniature

Lydia Davis writes ultra-short short stories that straddle the line between prose poem and absurd joke. A child of two writers, she accepted fiction as her work without enjoying it very much, until discovering a certain book that showed her what she was meant to do. 

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Aha Moment: Mary Karr's "Entering the Kingdom"

Ten years ago, Beth Greenspan put a poem in her wallet that she’s carried ever since. Her son was just on the verge of adolescence, and she was wistful. “I noticed that his wrists were starting to get thicker, his hands were starting to look bigger. His hand was almost the size of my own hand.”

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Alana from Studio 360

Hi Kate,

The piano piece is "Le matin" by Yann Tiersen. You can find music playlists for all of the music featured on our show on each story page.

Thanks for listening!

May. 14 2014 11:40 AM
kate gurtowsky

what was that lovely piano music playing in back of Lydia Davis interview?

May. 14 2014 11:08 AM
susy smart

I was very disappointed by the Seth Rogen interview. First, I don't want Studio 360 to be one of those shows interviewing the celebrity who needs publicity for their new film: you have been so much better than that. And I can hear that celeb on every other radio show within the same week....
Second, if you are going to interview Rogen, at least ask him some real questions about the roles he plays (films he produces) and how it has contributed to a almost deviant culture of adolescent males. Here is an article you might have read in advance, and used to provoke a thoughtful discussion of the behavior he glorifies:

http://www.psmag.com/navigation/books-and-culture/tortured-rise-american-bro-80842/

and no I didn't write the article and don't know the person who did....

May. 11 2014 07:24 PM

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